Category

AMA

Dojo AMA – The Dojo Framework From Then to Now

By AMA, Blog, Dojo

The Dojo Project joined the OpenJS Foundation for an AMA on YouTube on November 9th, 2020. The AMA aimed to share insight into the Dojo Project from inception to beyond the current application. Dojo co-creator Dylan Schiemann moderated the AMA with Anthony Gubler, co-maintainer and architect of current Dojo. In this AMA, users were able to ask questions via Twitter and live YouTube chat. 

Questions ranged from how Dojo has been iterated on over the years to what similarities and differences Dojo has with various other frameworks. Discussion outside of Q&A focused mostly on the ways Dojo has changed over the years.

The full AMA is available here: OpenJS Foundation AMA – Dojo

If you’d like to check out specific topics from the AMA jump down to the timestamps.

Timestamps

0:00 Brief Introduction

0:50 Moderator Introduction

1:30 Where Dojo Is Today

2:40 Why the Name “Dojo”?

5:15 What do People need from a Framework Today?

6:40 Modern Dojo

9:15 Dojo 8 Enhancements and Modern Dojo Changes 

12:05 Modern Dojo New User Questions?  

15:42 Are Custom Elements the Future?

20:15 Dojo Improvements to Application Loading Time?

23:35 Dojo Styling

26:58 Building Dojo

30:18 Getting Dojo Theming Right

31:58 Largest App Built With Dojo?

37:02 MobX vs Dojo

40:37 Overlap between Overlap and Dojo

44:05 Dojo Naming Design

49:50 What Can Be Done To Support Syntax Beyond JSX?

51:50 If You’re Writing an App in React or Angular, What Should You Do To Port Your Project to Dojo? 

55:25 What’s Possible for Dojo?

58:05 Wrap-Up

OpenJS Foundation AMA: AMP Project TSC

By AMA, AMP, Blog, Project Updates

AMP Project joined the OpenJS Foundation this past summer as a Growth project, aiming to create a more “user-first” open web experience for all. In this AMA, users were able to ask questions via Twitter (#AskAMP) and live YouTube chat. This AMA followed AMP Fest, which can be viewed here. AMP Fest focuses on content where participants could “learn about the latest ways the community is working to make the web better for everyone – publishers, platforms, advertisers, creators, and of course, users.”

Moderated by Naina Raisinghani, the AMA was a way to learn more about the project with David Strauss, Chris Papazian, Dima Voytenko, Malte Ubl, Saulo Santos, Kasiana McLenaghan, and Rudy Galfi.

Questions ranged from what project individuals were most excited about to whether there should be ramifications or praise for net neutrality or the lack thereof. The talk took a mix of inquiries from chat and preset questions. 

The full AMA is available here: OpenJS Foundation AMA – AMP Project

Timestamps

0:00 Brief Introduction

1:09 Introduction

4:42 AMP Fest Recap

6:10 AMP Projects You’re Excited About?

9:50 Can TSC Share What Platforms Support AMP?

11:47 What Is The Most Critical Part of Stories?

15:25 What’s One Use Case For AMP In Email? 

19:20 Does the TSC Have Any Thoughts On NYT Content Application Framework Proposal? 

25:20 What Improvements Does The TSC Want To Make In The New Year?

31:35 Will Websites Need AMP and HTML To Get Picked Up By Publishing Platforms?

40:20 More Approachable Architectural Options For HTML Conversion On High Volume Sites

43:58 Do You See The Project Working On Components Or User-Built Components 

48:44 Should Publishers or Companies Be Encouraged or Penalized For Prioritizing Websites?

50:45 Are There Any Updates On AMP Runtime Giving a PWA For Navigating Amongst AMP Pages. Any Update?

52:00 Any Chance That People Will Be Able to Embed>React>AMP as Opposed to Embed>AMP>React?

56:00 Closing Thoughts

How ESLint Helps Developers to Write Better Code

By AMA, Blog, ESLint

In the OpenJS Foundation “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) series, we get to hear from many inspiring leaders in the JavaScript community. We will highlight the key questions answered by the panel members and provide resources to help developers save time and improve their code. This month, we feature ESLint.

In the middle of a project it can be difficult to identify redundant or problematic sections of code. Frustrations compound when multiple developers, all using different styles, need to collaborate and write using a unified format. However, the aforementioned problems can be avoided with gentle reminders and automated feedback.

This is where linters come in. Linters are essentially spell checkers for code. They highlight syntax errors, refactoring opportunities and style/formatting issues as code is written. This helps developers to notice and fix small errors before they become a major problem. ESLint is an especially powerful tool that identifies problematic sections of code based on the user’s plugins, rules and configurations. Due to its flexibility, it has become an incredibly popular addition to many projects. Kai Cataldo, a maintainer of ESLint, and Brandon Mills, a member of the Technical Steering Committee, answered questions and explained how to get started with the OpenJS project in a recent AMA. 

In the talk, Cataldo clarified that ESLint is designed to help developers write the code they want. It should not tell them whether their code is “right” or “wrong” unless the error is code-breaking. The default settings of ESLint help developers to recognize syntax errors early on, but the tool can be made more powerful with the addition of user defined rules or downloadable configurations. Additionally, teams can standardize code across a team by defining a set of rules for the linter. Therefore, developers save time by writing consistent code that can be easily understood by other members. 

Cataldo and Mills also revealed future plans for ESLint — updated documentation, simplified configuration and parallel linting. They also discussed common problems of linters and how developers can contribute to the project to make ESLint even more powerful. 

Full AMA Replay

https://youtu.be/9BnJWfyZre4

You can find the full AMA broken up by section below: 

0:57 Member Introductions 

3:19 Background of ESLint

5:55 What is a linter?

11:42 Why ESLint is moving away from correcting styling “errors” 

13:32 Future plans for ESLint

21:57 Will you add HTML linting? 

26:15 Exciting features in newest release

27:35 What is the most controversial linting rule? 

29:39 How to get started

32:25 Why doesn’t ESLint have default configurations? 

36:44 How to contribute

For those interested in becoming involved in the projects please check out the following resources:

OpenJS Foundation AMA: Node.js Certifications

By AMA, Blog, Certification, Node.js

In this AMA, we discussed the benefits of the OpenJS Node.js certification program. The certification tests a developer’s knowledge of Node.js and allows them to quickly establish their credibility and value in the job market. Robin Ginn, OpenJS Foundation Executive Director, served as the moderator. David Clements, Technical Lead of OpenJS Certifications, and Adrian Estrada, VP of Engineering at NodeSource, answered questions posed by the community. The full AMA is available at the link below: 

The OpenJS Foundation offers two certifications: OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD) and OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD). The Application Developer certification tests general knowledge of Node.js (file systems, streams etc.). On the other hand, the Services Developer certification asks developers to create basic Node services that might be required by a startup or enterprise. Services might include server setup and developing security to protect against malicious user input. 

In the talk, Clements and Estrada discussed why they created the certifications. They wanted to create an absolute measure of practical skill to help developers stand out and ease the difficulties of hiring for the industry. To that end, OpenJS certifications are relatively cheap and applicable to real world problems encountered in startup and enterprise environments. 

A timestamped summary of the video is available below: 

Note: If you are not familiar with the basics of the two certifications offered by the OpenJS Foundation, jumping to the two bolded sections may be a good place to start.

AMA Topics

Introductions 0:20

How did the members start working together? 2:35

How did work on the certifications start? 5:07

Is it possible to have feedback on the exam? 9:50

Applications of psychometric analysis 12:26

What is the Node.js Application Developer certification + Services Developer certification? 14:54

How do you take the exam? What should you expect? 18:22

Will there be differential pricing between countries? 22:04

How is the criteria for new npm packages chosen? 24:55

Are test takers able to use Google or mdn? 31:52

What benefits do OpenJS certifications have for developers? 33:22

How to use the certification after completion 39:43

What are the exam principles? 40:56

How much experience is required for the exam? 44:12 

Course available in Chinese 49:09

How will new Node versions affect the certifications? 53:43 

Closing thoughts 56:35

Node.js Security Working Group AMA Recap

By AMA, Blog, Node.js

Members of the Node.js Security Working Group recently answered questions regarding what their group does, and how the security of Node.js can be improved. The Node.js Security Working Group is a community driven project that investigates security reports to reduce the vulnerability of the Node.js ecosystem. Liran Tal, a senior developer advocate at Snyk served as the moderator for the AMA series. Vladimir de Turckheim, a developer at Sqreen, and Michael Dawson, IBM community lead for Node.js, answered questions and discussed topics posed by viewers of the live stream. 

Full panel discussion available here 

The content of the AMA generally fell into two categories: a discussion of how the Security  Working Group functions or a response to a viewer’s security concern. The talk began with a discussion of “bug bounties” — monetary rewards given to developers who report potential security vulnerabilities in the Node.js ecosystem. Dawson and Turckheim discussed problems with this system, challenges that the working group has faced and the future of the group in a changing landscape. 

Dawson and Turckheim also addressed security concerns that viewers of the live stream had. The questions spanned a wide range of topics, from identifying security risks to using https to protect online data. Finally, the members of the panel reviewed how people can join working groups. They admitted that working groups take up a lot of time, but are a good way to give back to the community, and meet people who share similar interests. 

A summary of the video is available below: 

Panel starts 0:25

Member introductions 1:33

What is the Node.js Security Working Group? 04:52

How the members got started, what current members do (Vladimir) 10:18

Bug Bounties 12:13

Where can you find the Security Working Group? 14:43

How Bug Bounties can create tension 15:21

Potential alterations to the Bug Bounty system 19:19

How to roll out a patch to the Node.js ecosystem 23:04

Challenges that the Security Working Group faces 24:19

Interactions with the OpenJS and larger Node.js community 33:58

Using pattern searches to detect security issues early 40:09

How to secure JSON data transmissions 43:30

Should a best practice security guide be created? 46:50

Are malicious modules as common as they used to be? 50:30 

How to tell between unintended bugs and malicious modules 53:35 

Closing thoughts 55:28  

Node-RED Creators AMA Recap

By AMA, Blog, Node-RED
Node-RED AMA participants answer community questions live.

The creators of Node-RED recently gave an informative Ask Me Anything (AMA) which you can watch below. Node-RED is a Growth Project at the OpenJS Foundation. Speakers include Nick O’Leary (@knolleary), Dave Conway-Jones (@ceejay), and John Walicki (@johnwalicki).

This AMA can help individuals interested in Node-RED get a better understanding of the frameworking tool. Using a combination of user generated and preexisting questions, the discussion focuses heavily on the processes employed by the creators of Node-RED to optimize the tool.

The creators of Node-RED answered questions from the live chat, giving insight into how Node-RED is iterated and improved. Questions ranged from where Node-RED has gone in the last 7 years to whether or not Node-RED is a prototyping tool. 

Full Video Here

Video by Section 

  1. Introductions (0:00)
  2. What’s been going on last 7 years (2:21
  3. Did you have use cases in mind? (4:46)
  4. What’s it been like to work with open source? (7:10)
  5. Why is Node red so popular in iOT space? (9:30)
  6. Where else is node red popular? (12:25)
  7. How do you answer the question “is it a prototyping tool?” (15:00)
  8. Where does Node-RED fit in the low programming world? (17:20)
  9. 2020 Recap, what’s next? (20:00)
  10.  New features in 1.1? (23:10)
  11.  Flow change for nodes? (26:00)
  12.  Thoughts about encryption? (28:40)
  13.  Do you see Node-RED scaling? (31:50)
  14.  Best practices for sharing readable flows (34:15)
  15.  Do you have large applications and flows being created now? (37:15)
  16.  What would you say to a developer who should use Node-RED? (40:00)
  17.  What can developers help? (41:25)
  18.  Open is a mindset, how do you wade through forums and open source? (43:30)
  19.  YouTube Q, on the edge constrained environment modeling? (45:40)
  20.  Node Red + AI? (48:50)
  21.  POV on containerization (50:30)
  22.  Refreshing node red dashboard, thoughts on replacing framework? (53:40)
  23.  Node Red conference? (57:45)
  24.  Last thoughts? (59:25)

Our next AMA is with the Node.js Security Working Group on June 3 at 9 am PT. Submit your questions here.

AMA Recap from the Node.js Technical Steering Committee

By AMA, Blog, Node.js

Members of the Technical Steering Committee (TSC) for Node.js gave an informative AMA, which you can watch below. Speakers include Michael Dawson (@mhdawson1), Matteo Collina (@matteocollina), Gireesh Punathil (@gireeshpunam), Gabriel Schulhof (@gabrielschulhof), Bethany Griggs (@BethGriggs_), Colin Ihrig (@cjihrig), and Myles Borins (@MylesBorins).

Full video here

In this AMA, the TSC took questions from the live chat and gave insight into how they got involved. Questions ranged from whether Node.js is good for image processing to thoughts on Deno. The TSC focused on a mix of preexisting and user generated questions.

Beginning with suggestions on how to get involved with Node and ending on the same note, this AMA can inspire individuals to join Node.js.

Video by Section

Introductions (1:08)

How to Get Involved (4:48)

When To Update Your LTS? (13:45)

Is Node Good For Image Processing Applications? (34:45)

Upcoming 14RX (42:00)

What Do You Think About Deno? (44:20)

Yarn v2 Module (51:07)

Wrap Up (53:55)

Photo Credit: Myles Borins

Our next AMA will feature OpenJS Project NodeRED! Submit your questions for the NodeRED team here!

webhint AMA Replay: Best practices for the web and other useful stuff

By AMA, Announcement, Blog, Project Update

The OpenJS Foundation recently hosted its monthly Ask Me Anything with folks from the webhint team. webhint, a hosted project at the Foundation, is a customizable linting tool that helps you improve your site’s accessibility, speed, cross-browser compatibility, and more by checking your code for best practices and common errors. Pretty useful stuff, huh!?

Joining the AMA was moderator Rachel Weil, and panelists Harald Kirschner and Tony Ross.

Catch the full replay below:

https://youtu.be/SIF6W8Livek

Below are some key moments and topics from the AMA:
3:15: Panelists discuss how webhint came about.

8:27: AMA participants talk through the unique things that drew them to the project.

11:45: What the webhint offerings are, what are the forms it takes.

16:10: What are the biggest problems webhint solves for devs and the community at large? 

18:35: How does webhint help developers fix problems they find in the codebase?

25:05: What’s the most interesting challenge working in the webhint codebase?

36:52: What’s in store for webhint in the future?

39:50: Code schools and webhint as a teaching tool.

The panel also encouraged folks to get involved by following the project on Twitter (@webhintio), at their website (webhint.i) or by checking them out on GitHub- https://github.com/webhintio/hint.

Big thanks to Rachel, Tony, and Harald for their knowledge and expertise!

The next OpenJS AMA will feature the Node.js Technical Steering Committee and will happen April 1st at 9 am PT.  Submit your questions here.

Ask Me Anything Replay with jQuery

By AMA, Announcement, Blog, Project Update

This month’s AMA featured maintainers from the jQuery project. Jory Burson, OpenJS Foundation Community Manager, moderated the discussion with Dave Methvin and Timmy Willison. Dave Methvin has been a contributor to the jQuery project since 2006, and led many project initiatives during his 14-year history with the project, notably leading releases for core versions 1.7-2.1.  Timmy Willison has been a jQuery Core Team member since 2011, and its Core Team Lead since 2015. Timmy is also the Lead Front-End Engineer at Spokestack.

If you are interested in supporting or becoming involved, there are a few ways to do so!
1. Check out the project’s GitHub repo and look for “help wanted tags”
2. Keep your versions of jQuery, especially if you are on 1 or 2. There are tools like jQuery migrate to help. If you are using migrate, take it out for production.  

For more insights, check out the full replay below.


The next AMA features the webhint team and is happening March 4, 2020 at 9 am PT. To submit your questions, go to this form.

Want to get caught up on previous installments? Check out the links below:
Node.js Http/Streams
Node.js Community Committee
Node.js Modules

AMA Replay: Node.js Modules

By AMA, Announcement, Blog, Node.js

Happy New Year! What better way to kick off 2020 than with an in-depth conversation with the Node.js Modules team. In the first Ask Me Anything of the new year, we caught up with representatives from the Node.js Modules team. Our panel included Ujjwal Sharma, Compilers Hacker at Igalia, Myles Borins, Developer Advocate from Google, Geoffrey Booth, Senior Developer at Walt Disney Imagineering, and Bradley Farias, Software Developer Advocate at GoDaddy.

Didn’t get a chance to tune in, no worries! Here’s the replay! Our next AMA is with the jQuery team on February 5th at 7 am PT! Have a question, submit it here!