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Streamlining contributions for OpenJS Foundation projects with new CLA infrastructure

By Blog

The OpenJS Foundation team has been busy helping several projects migrate to new CLA tooling. OpenJS has adopted the EasyCLA bot, developed by the Linux Foundation, as its choice for IPR assurance on projects that elect to use a CLA. This work has been part of ongoing, overall infrastructure improvements to improve long-term maintainability for projects.

EasyCLA balances the need to provide a friction-free solution for developers as well as a robust, auditable solution for corporate open source program offices. With the new tool, companies will be able to authorize contributions across all our projects, not just on a project-by-project basis, and authorize entire teams or email domains at once. Projects such as jQuery, ESLint, Webdriver.io, and Webpack have already been transitioned to this new infrastructure, with the rest to follow soon.

OpenJS Foundation’s IPR policy allows projects to select either a DCO or CLA for contribution agreements. Projects that have elected the DCO, such as Node.js, are not affected by this change. Interested parties can read more about the tools and policies on our repo, https://github.com/openjs-foundation/EasyCLA.

FAQs

Does everyone have to re-sign the CLA with this bot, or does my old signature transfer?

Yes, everyone will need to re-sign the CLA with the EasyCLA tool for any future contributions. Fortunately many corporate contributors will find that their organization has already signed our CLA, and signing the CLA as an individual is quite straightforward. If you have previously signed the CLA with the JS Foundation bot, that signature still covers your past contributions. You can read the text of the Individual CLA prior to signing here. Companies can read the text of the Corporate CLA prior to signing here.

I am contributing to OpenJS Foundation projects on behalf of my company. What do I need to know?

An authorized signer for your company will need to execute our corporate CLA before you can contribute, if they have not already done so. Your company’s signatory will also name one or more persons to serve as CLA Managers – people authorized by the company to permit contributions on its behalf. You can start that process yourself when you open a pull request and select ‘Corporate Contribution’, or you can request staff assistance to help onboard your organization. 

Why is this happening now?

Simply put, the old CLA infrastructure that supported some JS Foundation projects has stopped working and is likely not coming back. We were already in the process of migrating projects, but this has accelerated the timeline. Unfortunately it is not an option to remain on the old CLA bot, as the mandatory CLA checks on open PRs will never return.

My PR was open before the transition to EasyCLA, and I still have an outstanding JS Foundation CLA check – what do I do?

A small number of PRs may be caught between the two CLA checking tools because they were already open during the switch. In this case, you will see a check for both EasyCLA and `license/cla` on the same PR, and furthermore, that `license/cla` is permanently yellow. In the very specific case where the EasyCLA check is passing and `license/cla` is the only failing check, maintainers may bypass the failing `license/cla` check. If you are sure you have signed EasyCLA but do not see the check passing, you can trigger a recheck by typing /easycla in a comment on the PR or by closing, then re-opening, the PR.

OpenJS Foundation Opens New Node.js Certification and Training Scholarship

By Announcement, Blog, Certification, Node.js

Today, the OpenJS Foundation is launching a new scholarship fund to increase access to the OpenJS and Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) Node.js training and certification and help expand diversity in technology. 

The scholarships are being sponsored by the OpenJS Foundation Cross Project Council Community Fund, who will award 20 LiFT Scholarships for Node.js training and certification for deserving individuals who would otherwise be unable to afford it. The OpenJS Foundation is committed to bringing more talent into the open source JavaScript community, which involves reaching people who have traditionally been underrepresented in open source.  

The application is open now through October 15, 2021. Interested applicants are encouraged to complete the application.

Qualifications for applying

The OpenJS Foundation Cross Project Council (CPC), the technical governing body for OpenJS, is offering scholarships to provide opportunities for Node.js skills development to deserving individuals who would otherwise be unable to afford training courses or certification exams.

Global applicants’ must demonstrate a passion for Node.js technologies, have intermediate Node.js skills, and a proven interest in becoming an open source professional. 

What’s covered?

The OpenJS CPC Scholarships will cover the expenses for one Node.js eLearning class and one Node.js certification exam offered by the OpenJS and The Linux Foundation at no cost. 

American Express Joins OpenJS Foundation

By Announcement, Blog

Investing in technology to further financial services globally, providing secure and collaborative development environments through Amex for Developers and Amex APIs

SAN FRANCISCO – September 15, 2021 – The OpenJS Foundation, providing vendor-neutral support for sustained growth within the open source JavaScript community, is announcing today that American Express has joined as a new member. 

As a globally integrated payments company, American Express understands the key role developers play in building next-generation financial service applications and tools. The Amex for Developers portal shares Amex APIs and provides developers with best practice guidelines, documentation and support. Many American Express engineers contribute to OpenJS Foundation projects, and Amex is committed to backing the broader engineering community through open source.

“Open source ignites innovation,” said Brian Moseley, Vice President of Developer Experience at American Express. “We are dedicated to sustaining and supporting critical open source projects that underpin the JavaScript ecosystem. Joining the OpenJS Foundation is a natural next step to deepen that commitment and help us continue to back engineers and developers.”

“American Express is a major proponent of the use of open source, building the next generation of financial services tools and services,” said Robin Ginn, OpenJS Foundation Executive Director. “Fintech is evolving at lightning speed, and American Express is providing a key leadership role. American Express is committed to improving the infrastructure that supports open source and we are excited to work together on the next phase of JavaScript growth and development.” 

“JavaScript continues to be a core piece of many companies’ success, and the community thanks you American Express for your generous support. The OpenJS Foundation is positioned well to pursue its mission of driving broad adoption and ongoing development of key JavaScript solutions and related technologies,” said Todd Moore, OpenJS Foundation Board Chairperson. “We welcome American Express as an OpenJS Foundation member and look forward to continued collaboration.”

With a mission to help support the sustainable growth of JavaScript by operating as a neutral organization that hosts projects and funds activities, the OpenJS Foundation invites all companies that depend on JavaScript to join as members. Recently announced JavaScriptlandia provides a way for individuals to join as members as well. Click here to learn more and become a member today!

OpenJS Resources

To learn more about how you could be a part of the OpenJS Foundation, click here.

About OpenJS Foundation

The OpenJS Foundation is committed to supporting the healthy growth of the JavaScript ecosystem and web technologies by providing a neutral organization to host and sustain projects, as well as collaboratively fund activities for the benefit of the community at large. The OpenJS Foundation is made up of 35 open source JavaScript projects including Appium, Dojo, jQuery, Node.js, and webpack and is supported by 30 corporate and end-user members, including GoDaddy, Google, IBM, Intel, Joyent, and Microsoft. These members recognize the interconnected nature of the JavaScript ecosystem and the importance of providing a central home for projects which represent significant shared value. 

About American Express
American Express is a globally integrated payments company, providing customers with access to products, insights and experiences that enrich lives and build business success. Learn more at americanexpress.com and connect with us on facebook.com/americanexpressinstagram.com/americanexpresslinkedin.com/company/american-expresstwitter.com/americanexpress, and youtube.com/americanexpress.


About Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, and open hardware. Linux Foundation projects like Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js and more are considered critical to the development of the world’s most important infrastructure. Its development methodology leverages established best practices and addresses the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit their website.

OpenJS World Keynote: Breaking Transmission Chains with JavaScript

By Blog, OpenJS World

During OpenJS World, which was held virtually June 2-3, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to get a highlight of the speakers in a way that allows for people to hone in on the part of the talk that interests them the most.

Cian Ó Maidín, President and Founder of Nearform, covered how Nearform built a popular exposure notification app. Nearform designs, builds and operates web mobile and cloud platforms at scale. They are firm believers of open source and have been contributors to the Node.js and React ecosystem.

Early last year, Ó Maidín developed a chest infection and flu after returning from a trip. Shortly after, his wife began displaying similar symptoms. He remembered having a discussion with his wife where he predicted that this coronavirus would be soon labelled as a pandemic. A few weeks went by and he received a call from the health services executive in Ireland asking for Ó Maidín’s help to build an exposure notification application. He brought his team together and they built the Covid Tracker.

When building the app, the development team agreed on empowering people, prioritizing privacy, and creating trust and transparency as core principles. Plus make it user-friendly. The app itself helps track the number of people with symptoms and contact tracing. 

In his concluding remarks Ó Maidín mentioned how the success of the app has led to more organizations approaching Nearform, and so they wanted to make it open source and to roll out the technology as quickly as possible. He also stated how this has made them better equipped and ready to face the challenges that may come with the next pandemic.

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:14

What is Nearform 0:47

Story of building the exposure notification app 1:46

The call 6:03

Developing Covid Tracker 6:50

Principles 7:11

Journey from March 22nd – July 6th 8:50

What the app looks like 10:11

Scaling 12:58

Covid Green 14:51

Milestones 16:07

Summary 18:05

Closing thoughts and call to action 18:51

OpenJS World Keynote: Open Open Source and Making Great Places for Collaboration

By Blog, OpenJS World

During OpenJS World, which was held virtually in June, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to get a highlight of the speakers in a way that allows for people to hone in on the part of the talk that interests them the most.

During the OpenJS World Keynote Panel, Joe Sepi spoke to leaders in the tech world to hear their insights on the best Open Source practices and steps to make open source a more collaborative environment.

Joe Sepi, an Open Source Engineer and Advocate at IBM, spoke with Michael Dawson, Node.js lead for IBM and Red Hat, and Beth Griggs, Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat. They kicked the discussion off by talking about transparency, accessibility and the open governance model of Node.js. 

In terms of collaboration, Griggs mentioned how accessibility is key to Node.js. In an effort to lower the barriers to entry, being a part of Node.js is as simple as people turning up by clicking on a Zoom link to contribute and join the discussion. She further added that to help make Node.js a more collaborative space, mentorships programs have been set up. For example, she blocks off a couple of hours a week to shadow the process on the release working group. Dawson shared that getting many people together to share ideas requires coming to a consensus; his personal view is that sometimes challenges should be hard as it is better to spend more time in discussion before finalizing a big decision.

In their concluding thoughts, the panelists mentioned ways to get involved: taking a look at the projects hosted by the OpenJS Foundation, looking through the GitHub repos, analyzing your experience and interests and then just joining a call!

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:10

Node.js experience 1:03

Accessibility 4:30

The flipside 7:53

The Success of creating the OpenJS Foundation 10:43

Advantages of contributing to open source 13:25

Hiring in open source 15:46

Closing thoughts 18:51

OpenJS World Keynote: Restoring Balance in Technology – Lessons from the Indie Rock DIY Movement

By Blog, OpenJS World

During the OpenJS World Keynote Panel, Robin Ginn spoke to Jenny Toomey to hear her insights on the role the Indie Rock DIY revolution has had on technology and conversely how technology helped transform the music industry. 

Robin Ginn, Executive Director of the OpenJS Foundation, spoke with Jenny Toomey, International Program Director of Technology and Society at the Ford Foundation. Toomey shared her thoughts on the digital music revolution scene in the 90s and explained how Washington DC had many high-performing globally focused individuals; “…it felt like you were at the center of the place where you could change the world.” 

Toomey worked for seven years trying to find a balance between openness and control of records between the artists and record labels. That’s when she realized the way technology was changing the world – she explained that the early challenges of the portfolio included people not realizing ways in which technology was transforming their lives – and the systems that protected them. 

People in positions of power back then thought of technology as transactional as opposed to systemic. 

The Ford Foundation tackles problems of openness by building a field of experts who are concerned about net neutrality. Toomey feels optimistic seeing an enormous shift (which open source people always knew): the way you design something determines if it is rights protecting or rights undermining. She emphasized that competing models are key to transparency and honesty.

In her concluding thoughts Toomey mentioned the importance of bridging the gap between the public and private sector when it comes to matching skills to meet the needs of the public. She also explained how so much of the web is dependent on the invisible toiling of the open source community and how it is necessary for the health of the tech ecosystem. 

Full video here

Broken down by section:

Panel introduction 0:50

Washington DC music scene 0:54

Technology changing the music scene 6:07

Early Challenges 9:45

Strategies and solutions 12:23

Voice of the musician being lost in policy 16:37

Advice for those interested in working for the government & public interest tech 24:17

Concluding thoughts and favorite musician 32:19

Node.js Certified Developer Spotlight: Juan Picado

By Blog, Certification, Node.js, Project Update

We recently interviewed Juan Picado, a Senior Front-End Engineer at Adevinta about his experience taking the OpenJS Foundation Node.js Application Developer certification (JSNAD). 

Here’s what we learned.

OpenJS: Why get certified through OpenJS?

Juan Picado: The OpenJS foundation is a reference that protects, provides, and facilitates a platform to the JavaScript community, supporting open source projects, and is a well-known organization. Hand to hand with the Linux Foundation is the best support for a Node.js Certification that gives high credibility and confidence.

OpenJS: How was the test-taking experience? Compared to vendor-specific certifications, how is a vendor-neutral test different?

JP: I like the approach that the test was not based on multiple-choice questions rather on real-life problems. This provides an extra boost of confidence even if you have already years coding JavaScript and Node.js. The vendor-neutral focus is more on the language and fundamentals and that is essential knowledge worth having as a baseline because it does not expire. JavaScript and Node.js always evolve.

OpenJS: How has the certification helped, added value for you?

JP: I always felt insecure in a few areas of Node.js. Streams and Process always were scary to me and those are part of the core of this certification. Even having years of experience, I have acquired valuable insights and a new vision on how to make things right. For me, it has been really valuable and has helped me dive more into the specifics of Node.js.  A certification always has professional benefits.  

OpenJS: What are your career goals and how do you think certification can help in reaching them?

JP: Definitely, it is one important step on my career roadmap.  I’m a believer that the fundamentals matter and this certification helps you to achieve that with Node.js and JavaScript.

OpenJS: Anything else to add?

JP: It is worth mentioning that the e-learning platform in combination with the one-year period gives you enough time to prepare yourself. That is really valuable.

Through August 24, Linux Foundation certification exams – including Node.js certifications – come with a FREE training course to help you both learn new skills and prepare for your exam. Learn more about this great offer at https://bit.ly/2WQxlo9

An update on how AMP is served at the OpenJS Foundation

By AMP, Blog, Project Update

When the AMP project moved to the OpenJS Foundation in 2019, our technical governance leaders shared a plan to separate the AMP runtime from the Google AMP Cache, and host the AMP runtime infrastructure at the vendor-neutral OpenJS Foundation. OpenJS is happy to report that this complex task of re-architecting the AMP infrastructure is making tremendous progress thanks to input and guidance from the AMP Technical Steering Committee (TSC) and AMP Advisory Committee, as well as thanks to the AMP Project and OpenJS teams for coming together despite the work and life challenges that were sometimes faced during the pandemic.

About AMP

AMP is a multi-stakeholder open source project used across a broad range of organizations to increase web performance. It’s a web component framework with a collection of complementary technologies that help publishers easily create websites that load quickly and predictably on different networks and devices.

Today AMP powers nearly 10 billion web pages worldwide, and is implemented by Google, Microsoft Bing, Pinterest and Pantheon, among others.

An AMP Cache is a cache of validated AMP documents published to the web, which allows the documents to be served more quickly than if they were generated by the original site each time they were displayed. Two of the largest AMP Caches are operated by Google and Microsoft, each of whom use the foundations developed by the AMP open source project to build their own commercial AMP Cache. This is a similar model to how most commercial products are built today with open source projects such as Linux and other JavaScript technologies such as Electron and Node.js.

Understanding how the AMP runtime will be served moving forward

The AMP runtime is a piece of JavaScript technology that a developer can add to their website to be able to use AMP components for building their website. By using AMP components, their pages become eligible to be hosted by an AMP cache. Some websites may choose to host the AMP runtime files themselves, while others may want to rely upon the AMP runtime soon hosted by the OpenJS Foundation to deliver the latest version of the code on demand. Ultimately, the choice is up to the developer. Please note that  documents served from the Microsoft or Google AMP Caches will still download the runtime from the specific AMP Cache itself.

The AMP runtime itself is developed openly and transparently in the AMP Performance Working Group. This part of AMP will not change, as the goal in moving to the OpenJS Foundation was to ensure this work could continue under a vendor-neutral nonprofit, and this is still a high priority. What’s new is that after disentangling the AMP runtime from the Google AMP Cache, the OpenJS Foundation will manage the servers that deliver the AMP runtime files (the download server and the CDN). As planned, the OpenJS Foundation has been involved in the implementation of hosting the CDN and has been spending additional time to fully understand the technical requirements.

Hosting project infrastructure is a core service of our Foundation – it’s one of many ways we help maintainers manage the stability and delivery of their open source projects. The way OpenJS hosts the AMP runtime infrastructure will be very much like how we support the infrastructure for the popular jQuery CDN, which performs a similar function and distributes 2.2 petabytes of jQuery libraries per month. We are working with Cloudflare to host the AMP runtime CDN. OpenJS Foundation projects benefit from the goodwill of Cloudflare’s contribution to open source through its free Cloudflare Enterprise program, in addition to other CDN providers who support other OpenJS communities. 

As an umbrella organization, the OpenJS Foundation has a governance model that gives a strong voice to its projects. Each of the projects are run independently at the direction of their core maintainers or Technical Steering Committees, as is this case with the AMP TSC. At the same time, OpenJS takes on the non-development aspects of the projects, ranging from infrastructure support to marketing, to help our projects grow and get better every day.

We are thrilled to be making this change to help the open source AMP Project continue to grow and diversify its contributors as they all work to make great experiences for the web.

If you have any questions about OpenJS please reach out to me at rginn@openjsf.org, or on our Slack workspaces: OpenJS Foundation or AMP. If you have any AMP Project specific questions please feel free to reach out via GitHub.

Posted by Robin Ginn, Executive Director, OpenJS Foundation

How Open Governance Influences Open Source & Inner Source at GoDaddy

By Blog, OpenJS World

During the OpenJS World, held virtually in June, we heard from many inspiring people involved in all areas of technology. In this keynote series, we will highlight the key points from the keynote videos. We hope to share highlights of the speakers in a way that allows for people to discover what parts of the talk interest them the most.

In a recent Keynote Speech, Charlie Robbins and Jonathan Keslin talked about how Open Governance at GoDaddy’s organizational structure mirrors their communication structure, known as Conway’s law. GoDaddy supports internal groups in an effort to push the decision process to the engineers and content experts. They only use those outside their field when necessary. 

This technique has been successful for GoDaddy (GD). This process went on for a few years before a pattern emerged. Once they were motivated, volunteers stayed engaged because of interest in the mission of their group.

As GoDaddy’s internal and external communities have grown, so did the need for structure and governance. They created GoDaddy {open}. This is GD’s name for its open governance structure, a nexus of technology and community. It is extensible and repeatable and fostered by leadership. GD {open} groups are bodies meant to drive business outcomes or policies. They are formed across disciplines both technical and non-technical. It gives visibility to other parts of the company through shared goals.

Guilds are another form of open governance used at GoDaddy. Guilds are groups of people formed around a specific topic, such as a programming language. Individuals rally around a technical topic, sharing best practices and forming a community. One thing that guilds are not is a group that talks about standards or infrastructure. They are communities that come together to learn and grow. GoDaddy also participates in trade groups such as OpenJS, Domain Name Association, and Node.js. GD open lets them coordinate these across the company. GoDaddy also is an open-sourced supporter, and have many different projects released to open source and communicate these efforts with their engineering blog. GoDaddy doesn’t have all the answers, but they do support them whenever they can. 

Full link here

Broken down by section:

Conway’s Law 0:44

Open Governance for internal groups 1:10

Application of Open GoDaddy 2:35

GoDaddy Open Governance 3:40

Organizational Structure 4:00

Model of GoDaddy open 4:16

Application of Open Governance Groups 4:54

Guilds 5:40

What is a guild? 6:54

GoDaddy Participation 7:24

Open-source Supporter 7:36

GoDaddy External Support in Open Governance 8:16