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Project Update: nvm ships new version.

By Blog, nvm, Project Update

Today nvm released v0.38.0! This latest release includes new `nvm install` features, bug fixes, and updates to documentation.

Major updates include: 

  • Improvements to nvm install: OpenBSD source builds are now parallelized; nvm install -b will skip compiling from source
  • Bug fixes:
    •  nvm exec: ensure — stops argument parsing
    • fix variable issues on some shells; avoid conflicts with oh-my-zsh global variables
    • fix npm exec on older versions of npm 7
    • fix lts/-1 aliases being off-by-one
  • Lots of documentation improvements
  • Cloning the repo on windows should no longer fail due to test filenames

Check out the release notes: https://github.com/nvm-sh/nvm/releases/tag/v0.38.0

Node.js Certifications and Training Sale

By Announcement, Blog, Node.js

Node.js Certifications and Training Sale + New Preview of Testing Environment

Training and certifications are some of the most valuable investments we can make in ourselves, to both sharpen our skills, but also to show prospective employers, and the world, that you have what it takes as a developer. Now is a great time to invest in yourself, or in your engineering team. Starting March 29 through April 9, the OpenJS Foundation, in partnership with the Linux Foundation, will be discounting all Node.js Certification and Training. 

Node.js logo

Limited offer: check out the new preview testing environment
Today, in partnership with the LF,  we are rolling out a free Node.js Environment Preview beta exam, which focuses on our Node.js certifications, the OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD) and OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD). 

One of the most frequent requests we receive is to preview what the certification exam experience is like before actually sitting for an exam. Whether you get tripped up from text anxiety or low bandwidth, running through this Node.js Environment Preview will make you more familiar with the look and feel of the certification exam experience. This way you will know what to expect so you can focus on your Node.js knowledge.

This Node.js Environment Preview beta is available for a limited time — we have 4,000 free coupons to give away. Try it out and see how you performed on this self-graded environment preview. And don’t pass up this big sale.

Full sale details

Discounts include 

What’s included with certifications?

  • 12 month exam eligibility    
  • Free exam retake
  • Digital badge and PDF certificate upon passing

What’s included in online trainings?

  • Hands-on labs & assignments
  • Video content
  • 12 months of access to online courses
  • Discussion forums
  • Digital badge and PDF certificate upon completion

Node.js Certifications

Certifications are excellent ways to validate your own development skills to yourself, employers, and the world. 

The OpenJS Node.js Application Developer certification is ideal for the Node.js developer with at least two years of experience working with Node.js. For more information and how to enroll: https://training.linuxfoundation.org/certification/jsnad/

The OpenJS Node.js Services Developer certification is for the Node.js developer with at least two years of experience creating RESTful servers and services with Node.js. For more information and how to enroll: https://training.linuxfoundation.org/certification/jsnsd/

Node.js Trainings

Feel confident in taking your exams with the Node.js Training courses. These courses help prepare developers for the Node.js certification exams. 

This course provides core skills for effectively harnessing a broad range of Node.js capabilities at depth, equipping you with rigorous skills and knowledge to build any kind of Node.js application or library. While by design the training content covers everything but HTTP and web frameworks, the crucial fundamentals presented prepares the student to work with web applications along with all types of Node.js applications.

This course provides a deep dive into Node core HTTP clients and servers, web servers, RESTful services and web security essentials. With a major focus on Node.js services and security, this content is an essential counterpart to the Node.js Application Development (LFW211) course, and will prepare you for the OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD) exam.

If this sounds like something you’d like to know more about, check out more information at this link

Project Update: Next 10 years of Node.js

By Announcement, Blog, Node.js

Understanding the needs of the Node.js constituencies

This post originally appeared on the Node.js Medium blog.

node.js logo

TLDR; We need your help to make sure the Next 10 years of Node.js are as successful as the first. We are launching a survey, you can take it here to help us do that. To get a bit more context on why this survey is important, read on….

Node.js had a very successful first 10 years of Node.js and the project is working to make the next 10 years even better. As part of that we’ve kicked off the Next-10 effort to document what we think is important for that to happen. You can follow the ongoing work of that team in this repo: https://github.com/nodejs/next-10.

Without a handy crystal ball, it turns out that it’s a lot harder than just diving in and discussing our favorite technologies to see what the keys to success are going to be. Are things like WebAssembly, Typescript, etc. important to the people who use Node.js? I guess we need to better understand/document who uses Node.js first…..

So far the team has spent most of its time laying the foundation on which we hope to base discussions around specific technologies.

We started by documenting our understanding of the project’s technical values as these will help us balance different aspects when necessary: https://github.com/nodejs/node/blob/master/doc/guides/technical-values.md. It’s not as simple as X overrides Y but instead highlight what key values need to be factored into decisions. For example, there was consensus that good developer experience has been a key part of the success of Node.js and that it’s important for future success that we maintain that.

Next the team documented the Node.js “Constituencies”. The people/groups who have a stake in the Node.js ecosystem. We captured these in CONSTITUENCIES.md are include:

  • Direct end users
  • Application operators
  • Application Developers
  • Back-end server authors
  • Library/package authors
  • Node.js core maintainers
  • Organizations with investments in Node.js

We also documented what we thought was important to those “constituencies” in CONSTITUENCY-NEEDS.md.

We think we’ve got a good start, but at this point it only reflects the understanding of the small number of Next-10 team members contributing. At this point, we need your help to make sure we’ve got it right and/or update until we do. You can do that by:

Thanks for reading and we hope to get your feedback through the survey or see you get involved in the ongoing work of the Next-10 team. Thanks in advance for your help.

JavaScript in the Age of COVID

By Announcement, Blog, Event

The OpenJS Foundation recently hosted a panel to discuss current JavaScript trends. The panel was moderated by Nick Nisi and featured Chris Aniszczyk, Alex Williams, and Liz Parody

This panel is a follow-up from one held at an OpenJS Foundation event held in Montreal in 2019. How has our view of the future of JavaScript changed? What can we expect in 2021? 

Topics ranged from positive changes to the JavaScript ecosystem in 2020 to the ways in which virtual learning allows for more diversity and inclusion at conferences. 

With moves such as the release of Node.js 14, a resurgence in web component development, and continued work on TypeScript, the JavaScript community clearly continued to iterate and develop during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

There are some notable bright spots due to the pandemic. Because of the shift to virtual conferencing, users from all over the globe are now able to take advantage of industry seminars and workshops in ways that previously were not financially or geographically appropriate. 

And, the panel also covered how the JavaScript community continues to make efforts to create a more inclusive environment for underrepresented members, as well. 

The full AMA is available here: JavaScript Trends Panel

Timestamps

0:00 Brief Introduction

1:45 Moderator Introduction

2:45 Positive JavaScript Changes In the Last Year

5:00 Microsoft’s Influence 

6:40 Other Positive 2020 Notes

9:38 Security in the JavaScript Community

12:30 Security in the World 

15:15 Supply Chain Attacks

15:42 Are Custom Elements the Future?

16:40 Diversity and Inclusion

24:00 Inclusion for Conferences

26:00 Low or No Code

32:20 JamStack

38:15 JamStack vs WordPress

40:45 JavaScript Remains a Leader

45:08 JavaScript Performance Issues As a Writing Tool

49:55 Deno as a Node Competitor 

52:38 Anticipating 2021

57:00 Wrap-Up

58:05 Wrap-Up

Project Update: jQuery 3.6.0 Released!

By Announcement, Blog, jQuery, Project Update
jQuery

Congrats to the jQuery team on their most recent release, version 3.6.0! jQuery is an Impact Project at the OpenJS Foundation.

The new release includes bug fixes and other improvements including:

Thank you to all of you who participated in this release by submitting patches, reporting bugs, or testing, including Dallas FraserMichal Golebiowski-OwczarekWonseop KimWonhyoung ParkBeatriz RezenerNatalia Sroka, and the whole team.

To read more about the new version and to download, visit the project’s blog.

OpenJS World: 2021 change and 2022 dates

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

OpenJS World: New dates for 2021 and Dates announced for 2022

OpenJS World, the OpenJS Foundation’s annual, global event, will now be taking place on Wednesday, June 2, 2021. With so many virtual events, we know that Zoom fatigue is real. A wonderful community event, JS Nation, is now taking place on our original date. We had the flexibility to help alleviate the fatigue and to spare the community from this good problem of having so much great content from which to choose – so we are moving our event up. 

Text "OpenJS World 2021 Virtual Experience, June 2, 2021" over geometric lines.

OpenJS World 2021 will continue to take place as a free, virtual experience, and with keynotes premiering from the OpenJS Foundation YouTube Channel and sessions to be published immediately after. This format will allow for an on demand, “Netflix style” experience with a specific premier time and flexibility for international audience viewing, as well as more discussion opportunities with speakers. The event will also feature additional engagement opportunities, such as Slack chats and live workshops, mixed throughout. 

In addition, we are so excited to announce that OpenJS World is coming back, in person, for 2022!

Save the date for June 6-8, 2022 in Austin, TX. Get ready for great content, delicious BBQ, and a honkey tonk good time as we can’t wait to welcome our communities back in person, while keeping our global reach with more virtual connections. 

Q & A with Sara Chipps, CPC Director and newest OpenJS Board Member

By Announcement, Blog

Sara Chipps, the newest  OpenJS Foundation board member, took some time to give the OpenJS Foundation some valuable insights into her new role on the board. Sara Chipps is a JavaScript developer based in NYC. She has been working on Software and the Open Source Community since 2001. She is the cofounder of Jewelbots, a company dedicated towards drastically changing the number of girls entering STEM fields through play, and Girl Develop It, a non-profit that has taught over 100,000 adult women how to code. By day she’s the Director of Product, Community at Stack Overflow and works there to empower millions of coders to build and ship.

Q) Why is it important for the CPC to have a voice on the board of directors, in your opinion?

A lot of the work on the CPC is in service of the OpenJS projects. We work to make sure the individual projects have the resources and representation they need. The CPC having a voice on the board of directors means that the projects have a direct line to the people at the highest decision-making levels and that means as an organization we can provide effective governance. 

Q) What do you plan to focus on as a Foundation BoD member?   

I plan to focus on learning and listening from and to both the board and project organizations initially. As a person and a software developer, my focus is always on developer happiness, open ecosystems, representation, and inclusion. I imagine those things will reflect when I bring them to the board and I hope that I can be a positive voice.  

Q) What you hope your impact will be in this role?

I hope to continue the foundation’s work of sustainability in the open source JavaScript community. I hope I can bring the perspective of a long-time community member who cares deeply about representation and the ability to level up in open source development. 

Q) What advice would you offer others wanting to get involved with the Foundation?  

Join us! We have many open meetings throughout the week, you can just show up and listen. You don’t even need to do anything or have an opinion until you are inspired. People do it all the time and it’s great. 

Project News: Electron ships v12

By Blog, Electron, Project Update
Words Electron 12.0.0 is here with confetti surrounding it.

Electron, an impact project at the OpenJS Foundation, recently released an updated version, Electron 12.0.0. This new version includes upgrades to Chromium 89, V8 8.9 and Node.js 14.16. The team also added changes to the remote module, new defaults for contextIsolation, a new webFrameMain API, and general improvements. Full details of the new release can be found on the Electron blog.

Congrats to the Electron team!

Free Introduction to Node.js Online Training Now Available

By Blog, Certification and Training, Node.js, Training

This post also appeared on the Linux Foundation Training blog.

Node.js is the extremely popular open source JavaScript runtime, used by some of the biggest names in technology, including Bloomberg, LinkedIn, Netflix, NASA, and more. Node.js is prized for its speed, lightweight footprint, and ability to easily scale, making it a top choice for microservices architectures. With no sign of Node.js use and uptake slowing, there is a continual need for more individuals with knowledge and skills in using this technology.

For those wanting to start learning Node.js, the path has not always been clear. While there are many free resources and forums available to help, they require individual planning, research and organization which can make it difficult for some to learn these skills. That’s why The Linux Foundation and OpenJS Foundation have released a new, free, online training course, Introduction to Node.js. This course is designed for frontend or backend developers who would like to become more familiar with the fundamentals of Node.js and its most common use cases. Topics covered include how to rapidly build command line tools, mock RESTful JSON APIs and prototype real-time services. You will also discover and use various ecosystem and Node core libraries, and come away understanding common use cases for Node.js.

By immersing yourself in a full-stack development experience, this course helps bring context to Node.js as it relates to the web platform, while providing a pragmatic foundation in building various types of real-world Node.js applications. At the same time, the general principles and key understandings introduced by this course can prepare you for further study towards the OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD) and OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD) certifications.

Introduction to Node.js was developed by David Mark Clements, Principal Architect, technical author, public speaker and OSS creator specializing in Node.js and browser JavaScript. David has been writing JavaScript since 1996 and has been working with, speaking and writing about Node.js since Node 0.4 (2011), including authoring the first three editions of “Node Cookbook”. He is the author of various open source projects including Pino, the fastest Node.js JSON logger available and 0x, a powerful profiling tool for Node.js. David also is the technical lead and primary author of the JSNAD and JSNSD certification exams, as well as the Node.js Application Development (LFW211) and Node.js Services Development (LFW212) courses. 
Enrollment is now open for Introduction to Node.js. Auditing the course through edX is free for seven weeks, or you can opt for a paid verified certificate of completion, which provides ongoing access.

Tips for submitting a talk to OpenJS World

By AMA, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

Want to find out how to successfully submit a talk to OpenJS World? The OpenJS Foundation’s monthly AMA this time focused on OpenJS World and dug into some of the do’s and don’ts when submitting a talk. The deadline to submit is February 22, 2021. Moderated by members of the OpenJS World Program Committee, the AMA aimed to share insight into submitting talks and successfully presenting at OpenJS World. 

Participants included Rachel Romoff, Joe Sepi, Jory Burson, and Divy Tolia. People were able to ask questions via Twitter and live YouTube chat. Questions ranged from what OpenJS World means to the JavaScript community, to ways to get mentored before presenting an approved talk. Discussion outside of the Q&A focused mostly on the importance of participating in OpenJS World.

The full AMA is available here:

Timestamps

0:00 Brief Introduction

1:29 Introductions

5:40 What is OpenJS World?

10:45 Details about OpenJS World

12:58 What is a Program Committee?

17:00 CFP Process

19:40 How Many Keynotes Are Expected for 2021?

22:22 Can You Submit More than One Talk? 

24:10 Can Committee Members Submit Talks?

25:10 Is the CFP Process Blind?

27:30 Diversity Goals

29:39 Do’s and Don’ts of Submitting a Talk

45:15 Mentorship for First Time Presenters

47:00 Resources for Talks

51:25 Tracks at OpenJS World

55:15 Review Process

57:17 Getting Involved

58:25 Wrap-Up Comments