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OpenJSWorld committee members share their tips for submitting your talks to OpenJS World 2022

By Blog, OpenJS World

Want to find out how to successfully submit a talk to OpenJS World? This year’s event is taking place June 6-10, 2022 in Austin, Texas. The deadline to submit talks is February 14, 2022. 

Members of the OpenJS World Program Committee, Joe Sepi (IBM), Beth Griggs (RedHat), and Daniel Cousineau (GoDaddy) discussed frequently asked questions and answers along with personal tips for submitting talks and successfully presenting at OpenJS World. People were able to ask questions via Twitter and live YouTube chat.

The conversation ranged from details about OpenJS World, personal experiences with first-time speaking, talk length and formats, to ways to get mentored before presenting an approved talk. Discussion outside of the Q&A focused mostly on the importance of participating in OpenJS World.

The full talk is available here:

0:00 Welcome and details about OpenJS World

2:45 Confirmed keynote speakers to date

4:00 What’s the first talk you ever gave?

7:40 If you think you’re not into public speaking now, you might surprise yourself

10:00 Preparation and coping with nerves

16:30 How many talks should you submit?

19:50 Getting help from the Program Committee

22:00 Talk lengths, formats, connect with us: openjsf.org/collaborate, slack-invite.openjsf.org and join cfp-mentorship channel

23:40 Diversity goals, community fund

28:00 Do’s and don’t’s of storytelling

34:25 How technical do you need to be?

39:40 Even junior developers can provide value to senior audience members

41:10 Things to keep in mind

46:30 Topics and types of talks

48:45 The review process

53:50 Moderation, Code of Conduct, Inclusive Speaking

57:20 Calls to action

58:10 Closing thoughts

JSON Schema Joins OpenJS Foundation

By Announcement, Blog, Project Update

JSON Schema is the newest technical project hosted under the OpenJS Foundation! 

JSON Schema is a vocabulary that allows you to annotate and validate JSON documents. It defines how a JSON should be structured, making it easy to ensure that a JSON is formatted correctly, and it is useful for automated testing and validating. In addition, JSON Schema provides clear human- and machine-readable documentation.

“We are thrilled to welcome JSON Schema into the OpenJS Foundation. Building a community requires dedicated people and great technology, which JSON Schema already has. It also requires a reliable structure for open governance and legal support that allows worldwide communities to grow. As the vendor-neutral home to almost 40 open source projects, JSON Schema already fits in well with our ecosystem of projects,” said Robin Ginn, OpenJS Foundation executive director. “We look forward to providing resources and support to JSON Schema to help their community to grow.”

“JSON Schema’s supportive community has in part enabled us to get this far. This has been critical to its success. JSON Schema is primarily a validation tool, plus it’s gaining additional uses such as generating forms, generating databases, or generating other UIs. We want to make sure the community and technology can continue to grow, possibly in unforeseen directions,” said Ben Hutton, JSON Schema specification lead at Postman. “By joining the OpenJS Foundation, we gain the community structure and support – with a strong focus on open governance – to continue to build and enlarge the community. We remain committed to being an interoperability focused standard, and want to provide assurance that JSON Schema will remain open and owned by the community that needs it.”

“The OpenJS Foundation continues to grow, and JSON Schema is a great addition. It is a key foundational technology, and by joining the OpenJS Foundation, it now has a strong home for further growth,” said Todd Moore, OpenJS Foundation Board Chairperson and Chief Developer Advocate IBM. “We are looking forward to working with and supporting JSON Schema.”

“The OpenJS Foundation is continuing to support key technologies that JavaScript communities rely upon. JSON Schema is an important addition,” said Joe Sepi, Open Source Program Director at IBM, and chairperson of the OpenJS Foundation Cross Project Council.“ JSON Schema is a great example of how interconnected JavaScript technologies can be. Providing a structure for sharing data is critical.”

“The Cross Project Council carefully considers the projects that join our neutral home at the OpenJS Foundation. We are pleased to have JSON Schema onboard so we can support the project’s growth, and the maintainers can contribute their expertise to the broader JavaScript ecosystem through OpenJS,” said Eemeli Aro, Staff Software Engineer at Mozilla, and OpenJS Cross Project Council (CPC) member. 

JSON Schema will be designated “At-Large,” which includes many different types of projects but is most often used for stable projects with minimal needs. They are now officially in the incubation process where projects complete their on-boarding to join the foundation.

To find out more about JSON Schema, including a complete list of current implementations, see https://json-schema.org/ 

JSON Schema Resources

 

OpenJS Resources

Click here to learn more about how you could be a part of the OpenJS Foundation, and view these additional resources:

 

About OpenJS Foundation

The OpenJS Foundation is committed to supporting the healthy growth of the JavaScript ecosystem and web technologies by providing a neutral organization to host and sustain projects and collaboratively fund activities for the benefit of the community at large. The OpenJS Foundation is currently home to 35 open source JavaScript projects, including Appium, Dojo, jQuery, Node.js, and webpack. It is supported by 30 corporate and end-user members, including GoDaddy, Google, IBM, Intel, Joyent, and Microsoft. These members recognize the interconnected nature of the JavaScript ecosystem and the importance of providing a central home for projects which represent significant shared value. 

About Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, and open hardware. Linux Foundation projects like Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more are considered critical to developing the world’s most important infrastructure. Its development methodology leverages established best practices and addresses the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit their website.

 

Call for papers (CFPs) at OpenJS World conference now open for all JavaScript fans

By Blog, OpenJS World

We are excited to announce that we’re accepting speaking submissions for OpenJS World 2022, the JavaScript conference you won’t want to miss! This year we will host a hybrid in-person and virtual event, and we’re closely watching the state of travel, health, and safety recommendations amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. The global event is happening June 6-10, 2022, in Austin, TX, and the call for papers (CFP) is OPEN! You can submit your OpenJS World talk here: https://linuxfoundation.smapply.io/prog/openjs_world_2022/. The CFP deadline is Feb 14, 2022.

Quality content is an essential priority for the OpenJS World program committee, and we want to help people get a leg up in submitting thoughtful and relevant content. 

While it’s never our intention to provide strict directives on preparing your speaking submission, we have some general guidelines to help you craft the best submission possible. 

As you get started, here are three things to consider before submitting your proposal:

  1. What are you hoping to get from your presentation?
  2. What do you expect the audience to gain from your presentation?
  3. How will your presentation help better the open source ecosystem?

There are plenty of ways to present projects and technologies without focusing on company-specific efforts. Remember the three tips we mentioned when writing your proposal as a simple guide for yourself. Try to think of ways to connect your topic to attendees’ interests while still giving yourself room to share your experiences, educate the community about an issue, or generate interest in a project. This year’s presentation topics will include:

  • Testing
  • Automation / CI/CD
  • Security
  • Development
  • Community Building
  • Performance
  • General

First Time Submitting? Welcome!

OpenJS World is a way to get to know the community and share your ideas and the work that you are doing, and we strongly encourage first-time speakers to submit talks. In the instance that you aren’t sure about your abstract, please check out the #cfp-mentorship channel in the OpenJS Foundation Slack Channel.

You can join the slack channel here: https://slack-invite.openjsf.org

OpenJS Virtual Q&A for Talk Submissions

In addition to the Slack channel, we soon will be hosting an interactive interview session on submitting great talks to OpenJS World. The virtual talk will be hosted by Joe Sepi (@joe_sepi), and will feature Beth Griggs (@BethGriggs_) and Dan Cousineau (@dcousineau).You can submit your questions here: https://forms.gle/fAjVWYEiNveo6BqS7 Stay tuned for date and time.
Ready to submit? Follow this link: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/openjs-world/program/cfp/

Test your skills! How good are you with Node.js?

By Blog, Certification and Training, Node.js

Lock in Best Pricing of the Year Available for One Week Only! Steep Discounts on OpenJS Foundation Node.js Training & Certification for Cyber Monday

Want to know where you stand with Node.js? Having a vendor-neutral Node.js certification badge from the OpenJS Foundation on your profile is an easy way for peers and managers to know that your knowledge has been fully tested. 

Cyber Monday offers the best discounts of the year on OpenJS Foundation Node.js Training & Certification. Available for one week only!

Job openings are at record highs, and Node.js developers are in high demand. The 2021 Open Source Jobs Report found that 92% of hiring managers are unable to find enough talent to meet their organizations’ needs. If you know Node.js, you can stand out through the OpenJS Node.js Training and Certification. 

An important goal of the OpenJS Foundation is helping close the talent gap so the industry has the talent necessary to build their business, while also creating accessible pathways for anyone who wants to build their career with JavaScript and related technologies.

We are excited to offer our best pricing of the year on our Node.js training courses, certification exams, and bundled programs, for Cyber Monday. From now through December 6, 2021, all these fantastic offerings are available at significantly reduced cost. Through our partnership with the Linux Foundation, we’re providing vendor-neutral training directly from the experts helping build these projects.

This year’s Cyber Monday offers include:

PowerBundle (Save 65%. Use Code: CYBER21PB)

Pricing:  Pricing is $1150 $399

  • PowerBundle
    • Linux Foundation Node.js Application Development Training (LFW211) + 
    • OpenJS Foundation Node.js Application Development Certification Exam (JSNAD) + 
    • Linux Foundation Node.js Services Development Training (LFW212) + 
    • OpenJS Foundation Node.js Services Development Certification Exam (JSNSD)

Bundles (Save 65%. Use Code: CYBER21BUN)

Pricing:  Pricing is $575 $199

  • Bundle
    • Linux Foundation Node.js Application Development Training (LFW211) + 
    • OpenJS Foundation Node.js Application Development Certification 
  • Bundle
    • Linux Foundation Node.js Services Development Training (LFW212) + 
    • OpenJS Foundation Node.js Services Development Certification Exam (JSNSD)

Certifications (Save 50%. Use Code: CYBER21CC)

Pricing: Pricing is $375 $187.50

View the certification catalog from the Linux Foundation Training and check out the Node.js certifications under the Web and Application Certification section.

You can check out the full details of everything that is on offer on our Cyber Monday Landing Page. Take advantage of the incredible discounts!

Hear from developers who earned the Node.js certification badge on how this program helped increase their confidence and further their careers. 

Prosper Opara, Junior Fullstack Engineer at Deimos Cloud in Nigeria, recently shared his experience with the Node.js Certification. Prosper said the certification greatly helped improve his confidence in his skills as a Node.js developer, and his team members trust him more with Node.js related projects because he’s certified.
Juan Picado, a Senior Front-End Engineer at Adevinta in Berlin gave details about passing the certification exam. He described how it helped him dive more into the specifics of Node.js, and the professional benefits of this vendor-neutral test.

OpenJS Node.js Certification Version Update: Node.js 14 to Node.js 16

By Blog, Certification, Certification and Training, Node.js

The OpenJS Node.js certification exam has been updated with new content today to reflect the latest current, long-term support (LTS) version of Node.js 16, which was released two weeks ago. The certification is ideal for the intermediate Node.js developer looking to establish their credibility and value in their career.

The testing content broadly covers competence with Node.js to create applications of any kind, with a focus on knowledge of Node.js core API’s.

The exams have been updated based on an evaluation of all recent additions to Node.js core APIs, the evolution of the Node.js ecosystem, and continual tracking of industry standards. As a result, candidates will see a few exam questions have been either removed and added within relevant topic areas without increasing exam duration.

To help prepare for the Node.js Certification exams, the Linux Foundation offers training courses for both the Applications and Services exams. The training courses were authored by David Mark Clements, a principal architect, public speaker, author of the Node Cookbook, and open source creator specializing in Node.js and browser JavaScript.

These exams are evergreen and soon after Node.js updates its LTS version line, the certifications are updated to stay in lockstep with that LTS version. Now that Node.js 14 has moved into maintenance, certifications will be based on Node.js 16.

To see what’s new in Node.js 16, check out the Node.js blog by Bethany Griggs, with additional contributions from the Node.js Technical Steering Committee. 

The OpenJS Node.js Certification program was developed over time with community input, and launched two years ago in partnership with NearForm and NodeSource. 

Discounts from 10% – 50% are available for all the OpenJS Node.js trainings and certifications for members of the OpenJS Foundation and supporters of its JavaScriptLandia program. Corporate subscriptions are also available for full access to the Linux Foundation Training and Certification programs.

New Faces on Our OpenJS Board

By Announcement, Blog, Uncategorized

As of October 2021, we have three new faces on the OpenJS Foundation Board of Directors. They are filling positions on the Platinum level, Gold level, and Community level. We welcome their collective experience and energy!

The Board sets technical policy, including “mission and vision statements, describing the overarching scope of foundation initiatives, technical vision, and direction.”

From our bylaws:

Each Platinum member is entitled to appoint one Director to the board, and the Platinum Directors are eligible to serve as chairperson and vice-chairperson. Gold and Silver members vote among themselves to select their representatives. The board also includes community representation, with up to 3 Community Director positions nominated by the CPC and its chartered committees.

Shayne Boyer

PLATINUM DIRECTOR, MICROSOFT

Shayne is currently a Principal Program Manager, leading the Developer Experiences team focused on cloud developer experiences for VS Code, Visual Studio and Azure. He has been leading teams in developer advocacy, enterprise, open source, web and the cloud for more than 10 years.




Daniel Cousineau

GOLD DIRECTOR, GODADDY

Daniel is a Senior Engineering Manager for GoDaddy’s UX Platform team, helping to deliver Javascript-powered tools and technologies to dozens of product teams ensuring a cohesive design and experience for nearly 19 million customers. He is also a passionate community advocate, helping organize community conferences like EmpireJS and meet-ups like QueensJS. He believes in the value that a healthy, accessible community can bring not only to future developers and leaders, but to the ecosystem as a whole.


Alex Liu

END-USER DIRECTOR, NETFLIX

Alex is the Engineering Manager for the Node.js Platform team at Netflix responsible for curating the Node.js development experience for hundreds of engineers across the company. His team builds on the shoulders of the incredible open source communities that have found a home in the OpenJS Foundation, and advocates for the continued support and sustainability of the vibrant communities that have made today’s ecosystem possible.

OpenJS World 2021 Keynote Recap: Node.js: The New and the Experimental

By Blog, Node.js

Bethany Griggs, Node.js Technical Steering Committee member, and Senior Software Engineer at Red Hat, describes in detail how new and experimental features are added to the Node.js project.

Griggs starts the talk with an introduction to Node.js, a highly decentralized open-source project, with no forward roadmap and a heavy activity flow in multiple directions. New features are added to the project based on the interests and requirements of the contributors. She introduces the Working Groups and Teams focused on different areas of the project and the Strategic Initiatives which help smooth operations of the project.

Next, Griggs discusses the project delivery schedule for Node.js. There are two major releases per year with even number releases being promoted to Long-Term Support (LTS). She mentions that each release has three defined release phases. During the Current phase, the release line picks up the non-major changes that land on the Node.js main branch. The Active phase incorporates only the new features, fixes, and updates that have been audited and approved by the LTS team. Only critical bug fixes are part of the Maintenance phase and new features are rarely added in this phase.

In the second half, Griggs introduces a Stability Index, ranging from 0 to 3, which allows users to decide on features to use in their applications. She discusses each index in detail with examples for each of these APIs.

Griggs explains that Stability Index 0 indicates a Deprecated API which may be removed in the future versions of Node.js. An API is first Documentation Deprecated and then elevated to a Run-time Deprecation. Stability Index 3 is for Legacy APIs, which are discouraged from being used in new applications. She assures users that Legacy APIs will not be removed by the project, so applications using these APIs will not be affected.

Experimental APIs have a Stability Index of 1 and may change even in the long-term support phase. She warns that users must use them cautiously in production workloads. She further explains that experimental APIs are ones that do not have an agreed-upon design and are later modified based on user feedback. Stability Index 2 is reserved for Stable APIs for which Semantic Versioning applies and compatibility is a priority. Experimental features only get promoted to stable when the main contributors have confidence in the API and no major changes are likely. She then introduces some new stable features of the project.

In her concluding remarks, Griggs encourages users to look at and provide feedback on the experimental features of the project, which helps the project in speeding up the process of promoting experimental features to stable features. She also warns against the use of experimental APIs in critical applications.

Full Video Here

Broken down by section:

Panel Introduction 0:00

Overview 0:48

Introduction to OpenJS Foundation 1:09

Node.js 1:42

What’s next? 3:07

Working Groups and Teams 4:10

Strategic Initiatives 5:06

Releases 7:26

Deprecated APIs 12:14

Legacy APIs 15:12

Experimental APIs 16:47

Stable APIs 25:31

Conclusion 28:26

Application Monitoring Specialist Sentry Joins OpenJS Foundation

By Announcement, Blog

Evolution of observability in software development is moving application performance and error monitoring closer together

SAN FRANCISCO – October 21, 2021 – The OpenJS Foundation, providing vendor-neutral support for sustained growth within the open source JavaScript community, is announcing today that Sentry has joined as a new member. 

Sentry offers error tracking and performance monitoring to help developers monitor their application health from frontend to backend. Used by more than 1 million developers and 80,000 organizations worldwide, the company provides code-level observability to many of the world’s best-known companies like Disney, Peloton, Cloudflare, Eventbrite, Slack, Supercell, and Rockstar Games.

“We rely on JavaScript and multiple OpenJS Foundation projects to deliver Sentry services. Key components of Sentry are community-built open source, without corporate money and highly deserving of support. Joining OpenJS is a great way to give back,” said Milin Desai, CEO, Sentry. “We look forward to working closely with OpenJS to support the open source ecosystem and bring even greater value to our customers around the world.”

Sentry is known for their history of financial support to open source projects and is announcing specifics for a new, formalized round of giving. In addition to supporting the overall operations and infrastructure of the OpenJS Foundation through its membership, project-directed funding includes four projects under the OpenJS Foundation umbrella: Ajv, ESLint, Mocha, and webpack.

“Welcome Sentry to our JavaScript community at the OpenJS Foundation,” said Robin Ginn, OpenJS Foundation Executive Director. “Sentry has long been a champion for making developers happy, and we are grateful for their support to lift up the vast JavaScript ecosystem that calls OpenJS home.” 

“It’s great to have Sentry join the industry in supporting open source JavaScript at the OpenJS Foundation,” said Todd Moore, OpenJS Foundation Board President and VP of Open Technology and Developer Advocacy at IBM. “We appreciate the strategic approach Sentry is taking to supporting the critical infrastructure and business dependencies they and many others have for OpenJS projects.”

Sentry is also making a financial contribution to the Linux Foundation to support the broader efforts of the Linux community. 

“Performance and error monitoring are key to good software development, and open source solutions lead the way,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation. “Sentry’s thoughtful support of open source developers through its contribution to the Linux Foundation and OpenJS Foundation will help further sustain critical open source projects today.”

With a mission to help support the sustainable growth of JavaScript by operating as a neutral organization that hosts projects and funds activities, the OpenJS Foundation invites all companies that depend on JavaScript to join as members. Recently announced JavaScriptlandia provides a way for individuals to join as supporters as well. Click here to learn more and join today!

OpenJS Resources

To learn more about how you could be a part of the OpenJS Foundation, click here.

About OpenJS Foundation

The OpenJS Foundation is committed to supporting the healthy growth of the JavaScript ecosystem and web technologies by providing a neutral organization to host and sustain projects, as well as collaboratively fund activities for the benefit of the community at large. The OpenJS Foundation is made up of 35 open source JavaScript projects including Appium, Dojo, jQuery, Node.js, and webpack and is supported by 30 corporate and end-user members, including GoDaddy, Google, IBM, Intel, Joyent, and Microsoft. These members recognize the interconnected nature of the JavaScript ecosystem and the importance of providing a central home for projects which represent significant shared value. 

About Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, and open hardware. Linux Foundation projects like Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js and more are considered critical to the development of the world’s most important infrastructure. Its development methodology leverages established best practices and addresses the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit their website.

Node.js 17 is here!

By Blog, Node.js

This blog was written by Bethany Griggs, with additional contributions from the Node.js Technical Steering Committee and project collaborators.

We’re excited to announce that Node.js 17 was released today!

Node.js 17 replaces Node.js 16 as our ‘current’ release line, with Node.js 16 being promoted to long-term support (LTS) next week. You can expect new releases of Node.js 17 approximately every two weeks, keeping you up to date with the latest features and changes. As an odd-numbered release line, Node.js 17 will not be promoted to LTS. You can read more about our release policy at https://github.com/nodejs/release.

To download Node.js v17.0.0, visit: https://nodejs.org/en/download/current/. Similarly, you can find the release post at https://nodejs.org/en/blog/release/v17.0.0, which contains the list of commits included in this release.

Some of the new changes and features delivered in Node.js 17 include:

  • Additional promisified APIs
  • Stack traces with Node.js version
  • OpenSSL 3.0 support
  • V8 JavaScript Engine is updated to 9.5

Following our Release Policy, new features that are contributed to the runtime are shipped approximately every two weeks in our ‘current’ release line. This means that the majority of new commits that are included in the initial major release (v17.0.0) are those that involve breaking changes. We care about minimizing the number and disruption of these breaking changes for the stability of the platform and to make version migrations easier for our users.

Additional Promisified APIs

A continuing strategic initiative within the Node.js project is to provide promise-based Node.js core APIs. In recent years, we have added the Timers Promises API and Streams Promises API (both available since Node.js 15).

In Node.js 17, we introduce promise-based APIs for the Readline module. The readline module provides an interface for reading data from a Readable stream (such as process.stdin) one line at a time.

The following simple example illustrates the basic use of the readline module:

import * as readline from 'node:readline/promises';

import { stdin as input, stdout as output } from 'process';

const rl = readline.createInterface({ input, output });

const answer = await rl.question('What do you think of Node.js? ');

console.log(`Thank you for your valuable feedback: ${answer}`);

rl.close();

You can read more about the Readline module in the API documentation.

OpenSSL 3.0

Node.js now includes the recently released OpenSSL 3.0, specifically quictls/openssl, upgraded from OpenSSL 1.1.1. OpenSSL 1.1.1 will reach the end of support on 2023-09-11 (from OpenSSL Release Strategy), which is before our proposed End-of-Life date for Node.js 18 (LTS). For this reason, we have decided to include OpenSSL 3.0 in Node.js 17 to provide time for user testing and feedback before the next LTS release.

Among the new features in OpenSSL 3.0 is the introduction of Providers, of which one is a FIPS provider which can be enabled in Node.js. For details about how to build Node.js with FIPS support please see BUILDING.md.

While OpenSSL 3.0 APIs should be mostly compatible with those provided by OpenSSL 1.1.1, we do anticipate some ecosystem impact due to tightened restrictions on the allowed algorithms and key sizes. 

If you hit an ERR_OSSL_EVP_UNSUPPORTED error in your application with Node.js 17, it’s likely that your application or a module you’re using is attempting to use an algorithm or key size which is no longer allowed by default with OpenSSL 3.0. A new command-line option, --openssl-legacy-provider, has been added to revert to the legacy provider as a temporary workaround for these tightened restrictions.

Example usage:

$ ./node --openssl-legacy-provider  -p 'crypto.createHash("md4")'

Hash {
  _options: undefined,
  [Symbol(kHandle)]: Hash {},
  [Symbol(kState)]: { [Symbol(kFinalized)]: false }
}

For more details on the OpenSSL 3.0 release please see the OpenSSL 3.0 release post.

Stack traces with Node.js version

Stack traces are an essential part of diagnosing application errors, helping to provide visibility into what has gone wrong. In Node.js 17, the Node.js version will be included at the end of the stack trace when there is a fatal exception that causes the process to exit.

It’s useful to provide this by default as often when diagnosing reported errors one of the first questions asked will be “What Node.js version are you using?”

Node.js 17 also comes with a command-line option, --no-extra-info-on-fatal-exception, to omit this extra information.

V8 9.5

In Node.js 17.0.0, the V8 JavaScript engine has been updated to V8 9.5. (V8 9.4 is the latest available in Node.js 16).

Along with performance tweaks and improvements, this update comes with additional supported types for Intl.DisplayNames API and Extended timeZoneName options in the Intl.DateTimeFormat API.

You can read more details in the V8 9.5 release post – https://v8.dev/blog/v8-release-95.

Node.js 16 promoted to long-term support

Next week, Node.js 16 will be promoted to long-term support. This is a significant milestone, as many users, particularly those operating production deployments, will opt to only use the long-term supported versions of Node.js. This means for the first time some features will be available in a long-term supported release line.

Node.js 16 and later include Corepack, a script that acts as a bridge between Node.js projects and the package managers they are intended to be used with during development. In practical terms, Corepack will let you use Yarn and pnpm without having to install them. Read more about Corepack in the documentation

In Node.js 16, the V8 JavaScript Engine is V8 9.4. It’s through the V8 JavaScript Engine upgrades that Node.js gains the new JavaScript language features. In Node.js 16, we have gained the following language features:

  • Array.prototype.at (from V8 9.2)
  • ECMAScript RegExp Match Indices (from V8 9.0)
  • Errors with cause (from V8 9.3)
  • Object.hasOwn (from V8 9.3)

Other features new to LTS in Node.js 16 include npm 8 and the Experimental Web Streams API.

Node.js 16 is also the first LTS release where we ship prebuilt binaries for Apple Silicon. We provide separate tarballs for the Intel (darwin-x64) and ARM (darwin-arm64) architectures, with the macOS installer (.pkg) shipped as a fat (multi-architecture) binary.

Other project news

The project is also continuing its Next 10 effort. The goal of this effort is to reflect on what led to success in the first 10 years of Node.js and set the direction for success in the next 10. Initial efforts were focused on defining and documenting the project’s technical values and priorities.

Our next steps on this effort are to host deep-dive sessions on specific topics, with improving documentation and growing our contributions being two of the first topics we plan to discuss.

We welcome you to join our meetings, which can be found on the Node.js Calendar.

Call to Action!

Try out the new Node.js 17 release! We’re always happy to hear your feedback. Testing your applications and modules with Node.js 17 helps to ensure the future compatibility of your project with the latest Node.js changes and features.

Now is also a good time to start planning to upgrade to Node.js 16, which is due to be promoted to long-term support next week. Node.js 16 will continue to be supported until April 30th, 2024.

Also of note is that Node.js 12 will go End of Life in April 2021, so we advise you to start planning to upgrade if you are still using Node.js 12.

For the timeline of Node.js releases, check out the Node.js Release Schedule.

Thank you!We’d like to thank all of the Node.js collaborators and contributors, as this release is a sum of all their efforts.

Specifically, thank you to the Node.js Release Working Group for maintaining and producing Node.js releases and the Node.js Build Working Group for keeping the project infrastructure running.

Retiring the Node.js Community Committee

By Blog, Node.js

This blog was originally authored by Tierney Cyren and posted on the nodejs.org blog on October 7, 2021.

tl;dr: we’re going to be retiring the Node.js Community Committee, moving our existing Initiatives to exist under the Node.js Technical Steering Committee (TSC).

From the Community Committee’s side, we’ve seen a convergence of our initiatives’ goals with the goals of the work that is generally under the TSC. Further, we’ve seen a decline in the number of people who can consistently dedicate the necessary amount of time/energy. As such, separation between the TSC and Community Committee has become more of a barrier to accomplishing our collective goals rather than the helpful and necessary construct it once was.

The Past

I want to start with a bit of history as a form of preservation of the context I’ve collected as the Community Committee’s chair for the majority of its existence.

On January 11th, 2017, Tracy Hinds made the first commit to the nodejs/community-committee repository. This commit was the result of in-person discussion with a number of key Node.js community members at the 2016 North America Collaborator Summit in Austin, Texas, though there’d been a rising discourse to push for something like it for some time in various forums including the (now-archived) Inclusivity WG.

The stated goal of the Community Committee has been to be a top-level commitment of and investment in the Node.js project to support community efforts.

At the time, this was particularly important. Node.js as a project was still figuring out its identity as a project independent from a Corporation while existing in a neutral Foundation. The Node.js community was foundational not only in the project’s success – be it in the v0.x era in the early 2010s, during the io.js fork, or post-reunification – and those starting the Committee wanted to be sure that we were effectively representing and enabling that from the project directly.

The Present

Since the creation of the Node.js Community Committee, members have largely spent project and committee time on outward-facing efforts with the goal of continuing to enable and grow the Node.js community. There’ve been multiple facets to this approach, some of which have been relatively successful and others that have been entirely unsuccessful.

The broad trend that I’ve personally witnessed is that the Community Committee’s interest and activity have slowed dramatically since its inception. My perception is that this is due to a couple of different factors:

  • Sponsorship and Investment:
    • A majority of work in Node.js is done by people who can dedicate non-trivial amounts of their paid time to progress the project, sponsored by their employer. Initially, there was already a small number of people who were able to focus their employer-sponsored time on “community” work – work that doesn’t ship features they need – in Node.js, and that number has only gone down over time.
      • do not think that this will be a universal experience in open source. Several other massive-scale projects are relatively successful in approaching this. They also have fundamentally different models and investment than Node.js does, which is likely a contributing factor to their sustainability. The Electron Outreach WG and the Kubernetes Contributor Experience SIG are both good examples of “success” here, in my opinion.
    • In general, JavaScript occupies a relatively unique space. It is ubiquitous, yet very few companies are willing to substantially invest time, energy, and resources into it despite their reliance on it. Lack of investment into community sustainability is one facet of this.
  • Necessity:
    • The Node.js Community Committee was created at a time in which the Node.js project was larger, with louder voices sharing relatively differing opinions on how we should approach the future. The reality is that we’re smaller now than we were then, and there’s generally less conflict around how we should approach community, safety, and governance. As such, the necessity for a distinct “community” focus is not only less but – in my opinion – actively detrimental to progress. It splits the project’s collaborators into different, disconnected groups rather than unifying the project towards the same goal.
    • The Node.js Community Committee was also created at a time when Node.js was relatively alone. Under the Node.js Foundation, we had to do a lot of community organization within the project directly. Under the OpenJS Foundation, we have shifted several initiatives that the Community Committee was charged with under the Node.js foundation up to the OpenJS Foundation Cross-project Council. As such, certain tasks that we initially envisioned being core to the Community Committee are now living in a different home.

The Future

I don’t believe that retiring the Node.js Community Committee means we’ll see a lack of investment in the community from the Node.js project.

Rather, I think it’s an enabling function for Node.js to continue to sustainably invest in the community. This means fewer barriers, more connectedness, and allowing for resilience in the ebb and flow of those who can invest to do so.

I look forward to what we’ll collectively work on next.

A Big, Heartfelt Thanks

Over the years, we’ve seen dozens of people contribute to the Node.js Community Committee and its initiatives, and I’d like to be explicit:

Y’all have been lovely over the past five years. You all care deeply about the Node.js ecosystem, community, and people. It’s been truly a privilege to have the opportunity to work on something like this with each and every one of you.

As we retire the CommComm, I hope that you see this as yet another evolution of the Node.js project’s commitment to the community… just as the CommComm itself was.