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Event

Node-RED Virtual Conference taking place October 10th

By Blog, Event, Node-RED

Node-RED Con Tokyo, a technology conference for all of the Node-RED users is taking place on October 10th 13:00 – 18:15 Japan Standard Time. Node-RED is a hosted project at the OpenJS Foundation. For more information and registration info check out the conference page: https://nodered.jp/noderedcon2020/index-en.html

A recent technology trend is “Low-code/No-code tools” which helps developers who have great ideas and eagerness create their own applications. Node-RED is a great example of a Low-code/No-code tool. NodeRED is suitable for industrial IoT, Web of Things, smart city projects, education, and prototyping. 

This conference features a great line up of speakers talking about their use cases and technologies using Node-RED. Talks will be in Japanese or English. The conference has been organized by Node-RED users groups Japan with input from community members around the globe including United Kingdom, Brazil, Indonesia, and Japan. 

Session Highlights

– “A mechanism to grow OSS Eco-System – Linux Foundation – OpenJS Foundation – Node-RED”, Noriaki Fukuyasu, Linux Foundation Japan

– “Looking to the future of Node-RED”, Nick O’Leary, IBM

– “DevOps with Node-RED. How to quickly turn an idea into a service.”, Masanori Usami, Uhuru

– “Node-RED suitable for education in the no-code era”, Wataru Yamazaki, Uhuru

– “Utilizing IoT interoperability and Node-RED based on the Web of Things standard”, Kunihiko Toumura, Hitachi, Ltd.

– And the other 15 great sessions!

More than 200 attendees have registered for the conference. Everyone can join the free event virtually via the web. We look forward to seeing you there, virtually! 

Register today!

OpenJS World Day Two Highlights

By Blog, Event, OpenJS World

Day two of OpenJS World followed suit with day one and included so many wonderful keynotes and sessions. We know nothing beats an in-person event, but this came pretty close! If you missed the day one highlights, check out this blog.

Before we dive in, a special thanks to our wonderful sponsors who made the event possible:

Thanks to Diamond Sponsor IBM, Gold Sponsors Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Google, Silver Sponsors Red Hat/OpenShift and SoftwareAG, Bronze Sponsors Heroku, Profound Logic, Sentry and White Source.

Keynotes

We kicked off day one with NASA Astronaut, Christina Koch. Christina talked through her year-long stay in space, her training, and how tech has evolved in space explorations. She even answered some community questions! Check out this interview we conducted with Christina for even more info. 

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Other keynote speakers included 

Sessions 

Day two featured many great talks featuring more than 25 breakout sessions and workshops. Presenters from many industries across companies and open source projects gave some really interesting and informative talks. 
To see all the replays, check out our YouTube Playlist.

Thanks and (fingers crossed) see you in Austin in 2021

The OpenJS World team and community truly pulled together to make this event fantastic. There were some bumps along the way, as we transitioned an in-person event to a 100% virtual one, but we are fortunate to have an amazing community, including our Program Committee, there to support and guide us.

Thanks also to all who tuned. If you are not already, please consider becoming a member. There’s lots of value in OpenJS Foundation membership. To learn more, check out our website.

Linux Foundation interview with NASA Astronaut Christina Koch

By Announcement, Blog, Case Study, Event, OpenJS World

Jason Perlow, Editorial Director at the Linux Foundation, had a chance to speak with NASA astronaut Christina Koch. This year, she completed a record-breaking 328 days at the International Space Station for the longest single spaceflight by a woman and participated in the first all-female spacewalk with fellow NASA astronaut Jessica Meir. Christina gave a keynote at the OpenJS Foundation’s flagship event, OpenJS World on June 24, 2020, where she shared more on how open source JavaScript and web technologies are being used in space. This post can also be found on the Linux Foundation Foundation blog. 

JP: You spent nearly a year in space on the ISS, and you dealt with isolation from your friends and family, having spent time only with your crewmates. It’s been about three months for most of us isolating at home because of the COVID-19 pandemic. We haven’t been trained to deal with these types of things — regular folks like us don’t usually live in arctic habitats or space stations. What is your advice for people dealing with these quarantine-type situations for such long periods? 

CK: Well, I can sympathize, and it can be a difficult challenge even for astronauts, and it can be hard to work through and come up with strategies for. For me, the #1 thing was making sure I was in charge of the framework I used to view the situation. I flipped it around and instead about thinking about all the things I was missing out on and the things that I didn’t have available to me, I tried to focus on the unique things that I did have, that I would never have again, that I would miss one day. 

So every time I heard that thought in my head, that “I just wish I could…” whatever, I would immediately replace it with “this one thing I am experiencing I will never have again, and it is unique”. 

So the advice I have offered since the very beginning of the stay at home situation has been finding that thing about our current situation that you truly love that you’ll know you will miss. Recognize what you know is unique about this era, whether it is big, or small — whether it is philosophical or just a little part of your day — and just continually focus on that. The biggest challenge is we don’t know when this is going to be over, so we can quickly get into a mindset where we are continually replaying into our heads “when is this going to be over? I just want to <blank>” and we can get ourselves into a hole. If you are in charge of the narrative, and then flip it, that can really help.

I have to say that we are all experiencing quarantine fatigue. Even when it may have been fun and unique in the beginning — obviously, nobody wanted to be here, and nobody hopes we are in this situation going forward, but there are ways we can deal with it and find the silver lining. Right now, the challenge is staying vigilant, some of us have discovered those strategies that work, but some of us are just tired of working at them, continually having to be our best selves and bringing it every day. 

So you need to recommit to those strategies, but sometimes you need to switch it up — halfway through my mission, I changed every bit of external media that was available to me. We have folks that will uplink our favorite TV shows, podcasts, books and magazines, and other entertainment sources. I got rid of everything I had been watching and listening to and started fresh with a new palette. It kind of rejuvenated me and reminded me that there were new things I could feast my mind on and unique sensory experiences I could have. Maybe that is something you can do to keep it fresh and recommit to those strategies. 

JP: I am stuck at home here, in Florida, with my wife. When you were up in the ISS, you were alone, with just a couple of your crewmates. Were you always professional and never fought with each other, or did you occasionally have spats about little things?

CK: Oh my goodness, there were always little spats that could affect our productivity if we allowed it. I can relate on so many levels. Being on the ISS for eleven months, with a lot of the same people in a row, not only working side-by-side but also socializing on the weekends, and during meals at the end of the day. I can relate because my husband and I were apart for almost two years if you take into account my training in Russia, and then my flight. Of course, now, we are together 24 hours a day, and we are both fortunate enough that we can work from home. 

It is a tough situation, but at NASA, we all draw from a skill set called Expeditionary Behavior. It’s a fancy phrase to help us identify and avoid conflict situations and get out of those situations if we find ourselves in them. Those are things like communication — which I know we should all be doing our best at, as well as group living. But there are other things NASA brought up in our training are self-care, team care, leadership, and particularly, followership. Often, we talk about leadership as an essential quality, but we forget that followership and supporting a leader are also very important. That is important in any relationship, whether it is a family, a marriage, helping the other people on your team, even if it is an idea that they are carrying through that is for the betterment of the whole community or something like that. The self-care and team care are really about recognizing when people on your team or in your household may need support, knowing when you need that support, and being OK with asking for it and being clear about what needs you may have.

A common thread among all those lines is supporting each other. One way, in my opinion, the easiest way to get yourself out of feeling sorry for whatever situation you might be in is to think about the situation everyone else is in and what they might need. Asking someone else, “Hey, how are you doing today, what can I do for you?” is another way to switch that focus. It helped me on my mission, and it is helping me at home in quarantine and recognizing that it is not always easy. If you are finding that you have to try hard and dig deep to use some of these strategies, you are not alone — that is what takes right now. But you can do it, and you can get through it.

JP: I have heard that being in the arctic is not unlike being on another planet. How did that experience help you prepare for being in space, and potentially places such as the moon or even mars?

CK: I do think it is similar in a lot of ways. One, because of the landscape. It’s completely barren, very stark, and it is inhospitable. It gives us this environment to live where we have to remember that we are vulnerable, and we have to find ways to remain productive and not be preoccupied with that notion when doing our work. Just like on the space station, you can feel quite at home, wearing your polo shirt and Velcro pants, going about your day, and not recognizing that right outside that shell that you are in is the vacuum of space, and at any second, things could take a turn for the worse. 

In Antarctica and some of the Arctic areas that were very isolated, should you have a medical emergency, it can often be harder to evacuate or work on a person in those situations than even working on the ISS. At the ISS, you can undock and get back to earth in a matter of hours. At the south pole, weather conditions could prevent you from getting a medevac for weeks. In both situations, you have to develop strategies not to be preoccupied with the environmental concerns but still be vigilant to respond to them should something happen. That was something I took away from that experience — ways to not think about that too much, and to rely on your training should those situations arise. And then, of course, all the other things that living in isolation gives us.

The one thing that I found in that realm is something called sensory underload. And this is what your mind goes through when you see all the same people and faces, you keep staring at the same walls, you’ve tasted all the same food, and you’ve smelled all the same smells for so long. Your brain hasn’t been able to process something new for so long that it affects how we think and how we go about the world. In these situations, we might have to foster new sensory inputs and new situations and new things to process. NASA is looking into a lot of those things like reality augmentation for long-duration spaceflight, but in situations like the Arctic and Antarctic, even bringing in a care package, just to have new things in your environment can be so important when you are experiencing sensory underload. 

JP: The younger people reading this interview might be interested in becoming an astronaut someday. What should the current, or next generation — the Gen Y’s, the Gen Z’s — be thinking about doing today — to pursue a career as an astronaut? 

CK: I cannot wait to see what that generation does. Already they have been so impressive and so creative. The advice I have is to follow your passions. But in particular, what that means is to take that path that allows you to be your best self and contribute in the maximum possible way. The story I like to tell is that when I was in high school, I was a true space geek, and I went to space camp, and there we learned all the things you need to do to become an astronaut. 

There was a class on it, and they had a whiteboard with a checklist of what you should do — so everyone around me who wanted to be an astronaut was just scribbling this stuff down. And at that moment, I realized if I were ever to become an astronaut, I would want it to be because I pursued the things that I was naturally drawn to and passionate about, and hopefully, naturally good at. If one day that shaped me into someone who could contribute as an astronaut, only then would I become truly worthy of becoming one. So I waited until I felt I could make that case to apply to become an astronaut, and it led me to this role of focusing on the idea of contributing. 

The good news about following a path like that is even if you don’t end up achieving the exact dream that you may have. Whether that’s to become an astronaut or something else that may be very difficult to achieve, you’ve done what you’ve loved along the way, which guarantees that you will be successful and fulfilled. And that is the goal. Eyes on the prize, but make sure you are following the path that is right for you.

JP: Some feel that human-crewed spaceflight is an expensive endeavor when we have extremely pressing issues to deal with on Earth — climate change, the population explosion, feeding the planet, and recent problems such as the Coronavirus. What can we learn from space exploration that could potentially solve these issues at home on terra firma?

CK: It is a huge concern, in terms of resource allocation, so many things that are important that warrant our attention. And I think that your question, what can we learn from space exploration, is so important and there are countless examples — the Coronavirus, to start. NASA is studying how the immune system functions at a fundamental level for humans by the changes that occur in a microgravity environment. We’re studying climate change — numerous explorations, on the space station and other areas of NASA. Exploration is enabled by discovery and by technological advances. Where those take us, we can’t even determine. The camera in your smartphone or in your tablet was enabled by NASA technology. 

There are countless practical examples, but to me, the real answer is bigger than all of that — and what it can show us is what can be accomplished when we work together on a common goal and a shared purpose. There are examples of us overcoming things on a global scale in the past that seemed insurmountable at the beginning, such as battling the hole in the ozone layer. When that first came out, we had to study it, we had to come up with mitigation strategies, and they had to be adopted by the world, even when people were pointing out the potential economic drawbacks to dealing with it. 

But the problem was more significant than that, and we all got together, and we solved it. So looking towards what we can do when we work together with a unified purpose is really what NASA does for us on an even bigger scale. We talk about how exploration and looking into space is uplifting — I consider it to be uplifting for all across the spectrum. There are so many ways we can uplift people from all backgrounds. We can provide them with the tools to have what they need to reach their full potential, but then what? What is across that goal line? It is bigger things that inspire them to be their best, and that is how NASA can be uplifting for everyone, in achieving the big goals.

JP: So recently, NASA resumed human-crewed spaceflight using a commercial launch vehicle, the SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule. Do you feel that the commercialization of space is inevitable? Is the heavy lifting of the future going to come from commercial platforms such as SpaceX, Boeing, et cetera for the foreseeable future? And is the astronaut program always going to be a government-sponsored entity, or will we see private astronauts? And what other opportunities do you see in the private sector for startups to partner with NASA?

CK: For sure. I think that we are already seeing that the commercial aspect is playing out now, and it’s entirely a positive thing for me. You asked about private astronauts — there are already private astronauts training with a company, doing it at NASA through a partnership, and having a contract to fly on a SpaceX vehicle to the ISS through some new ways we are commercializing Low Earth Orbit. That’s already happening, and everyone I know is excited about it. I think anyone with curiosity, anyone who can carry dreams and hopes into space, and bring something back to Earth is welcome in the program.

I think that the model that NASA has been using for the last ten years to bring in commercial entities is ideal. We are looking to the next deeper set, going back to the moon, and then applying those technologies to go on to Mars. At the same time, we sort of foster and turn over the things we’ve already explored, such as Low Earth Orbit and bringing astronauts to and from the space station to foster a commercial space industry. To me, that strategy is perfect; a government organization can conduct that work that may not have that private motivation or the commercial incentives. Once it is incubated, then it is passed on, and that is when you see the commercial startups coming. 

The future is bright for commercialization in space, and I think that bringing in innovation that can happen when you pass off something to an entirely new set of designers is one of the most exciting aspects of this. One of the neat examples of that is SpaceX and their spacesuits — I heard that they did not consult with who we at NASA use as our spacesuit experts that have worked with us in the past. I think that is probably because they did not want to be biased by legacy hardware and legacy ways of doing things. They wanted to re-invent it from the start, to ensure that every aspect was re-thought and reengineered and done in a potentially new way. When you’ve been owners of that legacy hardware that’s difficult to do — especially in such a risky field and in a place where something tried and true has such a great magnetic draw. So, to break through the innovation barrier, bringing commercial partners onboard is so exciting and important.

JP: Let’s get to the Linux Foundation’s core audience here, developers. You were an engineer, and you used to program. What do you think the role of developers is in space exploration?

CK: Well, it cannot be understated. When I was in the space industry before becoming an astronaut, I was a developer of instrumentation for space probes. I built the little science gadgets and was typically involved in the sensor front-end, the intersection of the detectors’ physics and the electronics of the readouts. But that necessitated a lot of the testing, and it was fundamentals testing. Most of the programming I did was building up the GUIs for all the tests that we needed to run, and the I/O to talk to the instruments, to learn what it was telling us, to make sure it could function in a wide variety of environmental states and different inputs that it was expected to see, once it eventually got into space. 

That was just my aspect — and then there is all the processing of the data. If you think about astronomy, there is so much we know about the universe through different telescopes, space-based and ground-based, and one of the things we do is anticoincidence detection. We had to come up with algorithms that detect only the kind of particles or on wavelengths that we want to identify, and not the ones that deposit energy in different ways that we are trying to study. Even just the algorithms to suss out that tiny aspect of what those kinds of X-Ray detectors on those telescopes do, is entirely software-intensive. Some of it is actual firmware because it has to happen so quickly, in billionths of a second, but basically, the software enables the entire industry, whether it is the adaptive optics that allow us to see clearly, or the post-processing, or even just the algorithms we use to refine and do the R&D, it’s everywhere, and it is ubiquitous. The first GUIs I ever wrote were on a Linux system using basic open source stuff to talk to our instruments. As far as I know, there is no single person who can walk into any job at NASA and have no programming experience. It’s everywhere.

JP: Speaking of programming and debugging, I saw a video of you floating around in the server room on the ISS, which to me looked like a bunch of ThinkPad laptops taped to a bulkhead and sort of jury-rigged networked there. What’s it like to debug technical problems in space with computer systems and dealing with various technical challenges? It’s not like you can call Geek Squad, and they are going to show up in a van and fix your server if something breaks. What do you do up there?

CK: That is exactly right, although there is only one thing that is inaccurate about that statement — those Lenovos are Velcroed to the wall, not taped (laugh). We rely on the experts on the ground as astronauts. Interestingly, for the most part, just like an IT department, just like at any enterprise, the experts, for the most part, can remotely login to our computers, even though they are in space. That still happens. But if one of the servers is completely dead, they call on us to intercede, we’ve had to re-image drives, and do hardware swaps.

JP: OK, a serious question, a religious matter. Are you a Mac or a PC user, an iOS or an Android user, and are you a cat or a dog person? These are crucial questions; you could lose your whole audience if you answer this the wrong way, so be careful.

CK: I am terrified right now. So the first one I get to sidestep because I have both a Mac and a PC. I am fluent in both. The second — Android all the way. And as the third, I thought I was a cat person, but since I got my dog Sadie, I am a dog person. We don’t know what breed she is since she is from the Humane Society and is a rescue, so we call her an LBD — a Little Brown Dog. She is a little sweetheart, and I missed her quite a bit on my mission.

JP: Outside of being an astronaut, I have heard you have already started to poke around GitHub, for your nieces and nephews. Are there any particular projects you are interested in? Any programming languages or tools you might want to learn or explore?

CK: Definitely. Well, I want to learn Python because it is really popular, and it would help out with my Raspberry Pi projects. The app that I am writing right now in Android Studio, which I consulted on with my 4-year-old niece, who wanted a journal app. I’m not telling anyone my username on GitHub because I am too embarrassed about what a terrible coder I am. I wouldn’t want anyone to see it, but it will be uploaded there. Her brother wants the app too, so that necessitated the version control. It’s just for fun, for now, having missed that technical aspect from my last job. I do have some development boards, and I do have various home projects and stuff like that.

JP: In your keynote, you mentioned that the crew’s favorite activity in space is pizza night. What is your favorite food or cuisine, and is there anything that you wished you could eat in space that you can’t?

CK: My favorite food or cuisine on Earth is something you can’t have in space, sushi, or poke, all the fresh seafood type things that I got introduced to from living in American Samoa and visiting Hawaii and places like that, I missed those. All the food we have in space is rehydrated, or from MREs, so it doesn’t have a lot of texture, it has to have the consistency of like mac and cheese or something like that. So what I really missed is chips — especially chips and salsa. Because anything crunchy is going to crumble up is going to go everywhere. So we don’t have anything crunchy. Unfortunately, I have eaten enough to have made up for without chips and salsa since I was back. 

JP: Thank you very much, Christina, for your time and insights! Great interview.

Watch Christina’s full keynote here:

OpenJS World Day One Highlights

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World, Project Updates

Today was the first day of OpenJS World, the OpenJS Foundation’s virtual, global event bringing together the JavaScript and web development community. Today was filled with incredible talks and keynotes and while a little different than what we are used to, it offered us all a chance to learn and grow, virtually. We are thrilled to have gathered viewers from across the globe to our event and we hope you enjoyed Day One as much as we did! For those who did not get to attend today’s event, there’s still time to register for Day Two, and replays will be available in both the event platform and on YouTube next week.

Keynotes

Day one kicked off with Robin Ginn, OpenJS Foundation Executive Director welcoming everyone and going over a brief JavaScript History as well as an overview of our Foundation. We also heard from Anil Dash, CEO of Glitch, on tech and inclusivity. He asked some great questions of our community on biases built within tech due to a lack of diversity from those doing the building.

Other keynote speakers included 

  • Cassidy Williams, Principal Developer Experience Engineer, Netlify who gave her keynote on, “Learning By Teaching for Your Community”
  • Prosper Otemuyiwa, Co-founder & CTO, Eden who talked about “Media Performance at Scale.”
  • Keeley Hammond, Senior Software Engineer, InVision, who spoke about Electron’s journey as an OpenJS Foundation hosted project. 
  • Malte Ubl, Principal Engineer, Google, spoke about the AMP project
  • Dr. Joy Rankin, Research Lead at the AI Now Institute and Research Scholar at New York University, sat down with Kris Borchers to discuss “How (not) to Save the World with Tech”

OpenJS World Project News

We are thrilled to share that both AMP and Electron have graduated from the incubation program!

AMP Project Graduates Incubation Program

Today, during OpenJS World keynotes, Malte Ubl, Principal Engineer at Google, the creator of AMP, and a member of the AMP Project’s Technical Steering Committee, announced the AMP Project has graduated from the Foundation’s incubation program. AMP entered incubation in October of 2019 and during this time, the collaboration between the project and the Foundation has been very beneficial. Graduating from the OpenJS Foundation Incubation program signals more opportunities for growth and diversity for the open source AMP project and its developers. In becoming a full-fledged OpenJS Foundation project, AMP can better deliver on its vision of delivering  “A strong, user-first open web forever.” 

Electron Project Graduates Incubation Program

Today at OpenJS World, Keeley Hammond, Senior Software Engineer at InVision, and a member of the Electron governance team, took the keynote stage and let the world know that Electron has successfully graduated from the Foundation’s incubation program and is now an Impact Project. Electron entered incubation in December of 2019, at the last OpenJS Foundation global conference in Montreal. This is an important step as it shows real growth, maturity, and stability for the popular web framework, which is used for building desktop apps across multiple platforms. 

Sessions 

Today we featured more than 30 breakout sessions across a variety of topics from AI to application development and project-specific talks. A replay of each of these talks is available within the OpenJS World event platform. You will need to register for the event or login to the platform to access these sessions. To find the replay, navigate to the home page, click into the topic area, and find the talks on demand. We are also posting on the OpenJS YouTube on Monday June 29, 2020.

Engaging Virtually Through Fun and Games

We’ve created a few opportunities for fun during these two days. Attendees can create a virtual badge, collect badges for sessions attended, and even earn points for cool OpenJS SWAG! We also held a scavenger hunt today where attendees had to search through sponsor’s booths and find birthday related items, in honor on JavaScript’s 25th Anniversary! Participants who collected all birthday party items will be entered into a drawing for a DJI Tello drone, provided by IBM’s Call for Code team! Learn more in the Fun and Games section on the event platform.

OpenJS World Day Two, and Collab Summit

We are just getting started this week! Please join us tomorrow as we kick off our keynote sessions with Christina Koch, NASA Astronaut! Tomorrow will be another fantastic day, a trend to continue into the OpenJS Collab Summit on Thursday (Project Day) and Friday (Cross-Project Day).

Thanks

Finally, and certainly not least of all, we send our sincerest THANK YOU to our sponsors who have made this event possible. This year has been challenging for so many and having sponsors come through and support this event is extremely appreciated. 

Thanks to Diamond Sponsor IBM, Gold Sponsors Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Google, Silver Sponsors Red Hat/OpenShift and SoftwareAG, Bronze Sponsors Heroku, Profound Logic, Sentry and White Source.

OpenJS World – Featured Profile – Beth Griggs

By Announcement, Blog, Event, Node.js, OpenJS World

Since 2016, Beth Griggs has been working as an Open Source Engineer at IBM where she focuses on the Node.js runtime. Node.js is an impact project in the OpenJS Foundation. Beth is a Node.js Technical Steering Committee Member and a member of the Node.js Release Working Group where she is involved with auditing commits for the long-term support (LTS) release lines and the creation of releases. 

What was your first experience of Node.js?

I joined the party a little late, my first experience of Node.js was while completing my final-year engineering project for my Bachelor’s degree in 2016. My engineering project was to create a ‘living meta-analysis’ tool that would enable researchers, specifically psychologists, to easily combine and update findings from related independent studies. I originally implemented the tool using a PHP framework, but after some time I realized I wasn’t enjoying the developer experience and hitting limitations with the framework. Half-way through my final year of university, I heard some classmates raving about Node.js, so I decided to check it out. Within a few weeks, I had reimplemented my project from scratch using Node.js.

How did you start contributing to Node.js?

I rejoined IBM in 2016, having spent my gap-year prior to university at IBM as Java Test Engineer in their WebSphere organization. I joined the Node.js team in IBM Runtime Technologies who at the time were responsible for building and testing the IBM SDK for Node.js. From running the Node.js test suite regularly internally, my team identified flaky tests that needed fixing out in the community – which turned in to some of my first contributions to Node.js core.

Over the next few years, our team deprecated the IBM SDK for Node.js in favor of maintaining these platforms directly in the Node.js community.  Around the same time, Myles Borins offered to mentor me to become involved with the Release Working Group, with a view of becoming a Node.js releaser (Thanks Myles!). Since then, that’s the area of Node.js where most of my contributions have been focused.

What has changed since you first started to contributing to Node.js?

One of the biggest changes is the emphasis on onboarding new contributors to major parts of the project. Getting new names and faces onboarded in a position where they can actively contribute to Node.js, and also an increase in socializing how people can contribute in ways other than code. 

Documentation of the internal contributor processes has improved a lot too, but there’s still room to improve.

What are you most excited about with the Node.js project at the moment?

I’m really enjoying the work that is happening in pkgjs GitHub organization where we’re building tools for package maintainers. I’m excited to see the tools that come out of pkgjs organization and the Node.js Package Maintenance team.

What are you most looking forward to at OpenJS World?

There are so many great talks (although, I’m a little bias as I was in the content team). I’m really looking forward to the keynote with Christina H Koch, a NASA astronaut. And also, the ‘Broken Promises’ workshop by James and Matteo from NearForm.

On the Cross Project Summit day, I’m looking forward to the Node.js Package Maintenance session. We’ve got a lot of momentum in that working group at the moment and it’ll be great to have input from the other OpenJS projects. I’m hoping my talk “Chronicles of the Node.js Ecosystem: The Consumer, The Author, and The Maintainer” is a good primer for the session. 

I’ll also be at the IBM virtual booth throughout the conference and catching my colleagues’ talks (https://developer.ibm.com/technologies/node-js/blogs/ibm-at-openjs-world-2020). 

What does your role at IBM include other than contributing to the Node.js community?

A wide variety of things really, no week is ever full of the same tasks. I’m often preparing talks and workshops for various conferences. Alongside that, I spend my time researching common methods and best practices for deploying Node.js applications to the cloud – specifically focusing on IBM Cloud and OpenShift. I often find myself assisting internal teams with their usage of Node.js, and analyzing various IBM offerings from a typical Node.js Developer’s point of view and providing feedback. I’m also scrum master for my team, so a portion of my time is taken up with those responsibilities too. 

What do you do outside of work?

Most often hanging out with my dog, Laddie. I’m a DIY enthusiast – mainly painting or upcycling various pieces of second-hand furniture. Since the start of lockdown in the UK, I have also been writing a book which is a convenient pass time. Big fan of replaying my old PS1 games too. 

Where should people go to get started contributing to the Node.js Project? 

Go to https://www.nodetodo.org/, which is a website that walks you through a path towards your first contribution to Node.js. As long as you’re a little bit familiar with Node.js, you can start here. The other option is to look for labels on repositories in the Node.js GitHub organization tagged with ‘Good first issue’. 

Alternatively, you can join one of our working group sessions on Zoom and start participating in discussions. The sessions are listed in the nodejs.org calendar. If you’re specifically interested in the Node.js Release Working Group, I run fortnightly mentoring/shadowing sessions that you’re welcome to join.

Behind the Scenes on New Professional Node Certification from OpenJS

By Blog, Certification, Event, Node.js, Node+JS Interactive
Screen Shot 2019-12-19 at 11.21.50 AM

David Clements (@davidmarkclem), Principal Architect of NearForm, and Adrian Estrada, (@edsadr), VP of NodeSource, gave a comprehensive overview of the new Node.js certifications at Node + JS Interactive, and we have the video!

Full video here 

In the talk, David and Adrian explore the reasons for the creation of the certification and why developers should get certified with OpenJS. They also go into detail around the guiding principles, how quality assurance has been implemented and what is being done to ensure long-term integrity. 

In the section on Inside the Certifications, they look at exam expectations, pricing, scholarships and an overview of the two certifications.

They ended with directions for the future of the certifications.

The industry is mature and there is more demand for Node skills than there is availability. OpenJS believes that the Node certifications create new opportunities, and are an excellent way to improve your resume and more to projects and jobs that are higher paying and more fulfilling.

Video by Section

It Takes a Community (:35)

Cross Organizational Effort (1:03)

Why (1:41)

Certification Committee (2:50)

Principles (3:20)

Quality Assurance (4:00)

Long-term Integrity Measures (4:45)

Inside the Certifications (5:20)

Exam Expectations (5:25)

Virtual Machine Environment (6:24)

Exams Overview (7:23)

  • OpenJS Node Application Developer
  • OpenJS Node Services Developer

Pricing (11:23)

Scholarships (12:48)

Regular Promotions (13:45)

Future (14:43)

More Information
OpenJS Node.js Services Developer (JSNSD)
The OpenJS Node.js Services Developer certification is for the Node.js developer with at least two years of experience creating RESTful servers and services with Node.js. It is designed for anyone looking to demonstrate competence in creating RESTful Node.js Servers and Services (or Microservices) with a particular emphasis on security practices.

OpenJS Node.js Application Developer (JSNAD)
The OpenJS Node.js Application Developer certification is ideal for the Node.js developer with at least two years of experience working with Node.js. It is designed for anyone looking to demonstrate competence with Node.js to create applications of any kind, with a focus on knowledge of Node.js core APIs.

OpenJS World Diversity Scholarship Open Now!

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

Education and collaboration are vital to the future of the open source JavaScript community, and it is a top priority that everyone that wants to participate feels welcome to do so regardless of ability, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, race, ethnicity, age, religion or economic status.

OpenJS Foundation is excited and proud to offer the OpenJS World diversity scholarship program to provide support to those from traditionally underrepresented and/or marginalized groups in the technology and/or open source communities who may not otherwise have the opportunity to attend the event for financial reasons. 

The scholarship application deadline is March 30, 2020. We invite you to apply ASAP! For details, check out the application form. Top applicants will be awarded a fully paid scholarship to attend this year’s event, including registration, airfare (up to $1500) and hotel up to 3 nights.

With the deadline closing soon, head over to the application form and apply today! Good luck to each applicant and we hope to see you June 23 and 24th!

Register today for OpenJS World and OpenJS Foundation Collaborator Summit

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

Registration for OpenJS World is open now! OpenJS World, formerly Node+JS Interactive, is the OpenJS Foundation’s annual global event that brings the broad JavaScript community together to collaborate face-to-face, network, and share their experiences. The conference takes place from June 23rd to 24th, 2020 in Austin, TX.

Attendees will benefit from face-to-face interactions discussing a variety of important topics like security and internationalization. Additionally, the program will provide content that is appealing to a broad spectrum of members of the JavaScript ecosystem including topics like Node.js, AMP, Electron, frameworks and best practices that span across many of the OpenJS Foundation hosted projects

Register here by Tuesday, March 31 to save up to $549USD on registration.

For those interested in attending the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America, taking place at the same location and dates as OpenJS World, you will get 30% off of your OSS Summit NA registration with the purchase of OpenJS World registration. Additionally, those attending OSS NA will also get a 30% discount on OpenJS World registration. 

OpenJS Foundation Collaborator Summit
Registration for OpenJS Foundation Collaborator Summit, happening June 25 and 26,  is also open. The Collab Summit is a place for contributors and maintainers working across all OpenJS Foundation projects to collaborate in person, share, learn, and get to know each other. You may register for Collab Summit as part of your OpenJS World registration or as a stand-alone event.  

Sponsors
As always, thank you to our awesome sponsors for supporting OpenJS World!
Silver: NearForm, Software AG, Sentry
Bronze: NodeRun

Visit the event website for more info on sponsoring the event.
Stay tuned for more as the full schedule, with keynotes, will be available in the coming weeks. 

Keep informed on everything that is happening by following us on Twitter (hashtag #OpenJSWorld). You can find all the details for the upcoming event by visiting the OpenJS World website.

Node + JS Interactive Highlight – Women Pioneers in Colombia

By Announcement, Blog, Event

Node + JS Interactive 2019 was held December 11-12, 2019, in Montreal and featured an amazing array of communities and individuals involved in JavaScript development. The OpenJS works to facilitate collaboration within the JavaScript development community and has, as its mission, an explicit goal of highlighting and supporting diverse groups from around the world involved in development of key JavaScript and web solutions and related technologies.

0Based in Medellín, Colombia, and holding meetups throughout the country (Medellín, Bogotá, Cali, Barranquilla, Cartagena, Neiva, Popayán), Pioneras Dev supports women developers from expert level to beginner. The Pioneras Dev mission: More women actively using tech skills to imagine, empower, vision, create and build a better world through updated computer programming languages.

In 2020, Pioneras Dev will be holding a 12-week bootcamp in Medellín and their first community conference PioConf.

To find out how to get involved: https://en.pionerasdev.co/

What is Pioneras Dev?

Pioneras Dev is the biggest community of women in tech in Colombia with the main purpose of sharing, teaching and learning technologies, computer science, web programming, software engineering and related disciplines. The initiative started 4 years ago in Medellin-Colombia, and in 2018 it expanded to other cities including Cali and Barranquilla.

Pioneras is a group of more than 1200 women across Colombia who share their love for technology. One of our main goals is to unite and increase the number of women in STEM. Among the Pioneras, there are biologists, mathematicians, physicists, systems engineers, electronic engineers, robotics engineers, designers, programmers, data scientists, among others. We are an interdisciplinary group of women passionate about learning and programming, with the desire to increase our participation in areas such as science, innovation, and technology; especially now, in the process of digital transformation that the region and the country is experiencing.

Areas of Action
● Programming for non-engineers
● Update on technologies for engineers and programmers.

Our Dynamics
We hold meetings on the first Saturday of each month in different spaces provided by supporting companies, education entities and coworking spaces located within different cities in which we have grown as a community.

The talks and workshops are open to the public with prior registration on the MeetUp platform. (The PionerasDev community does NOT charge for their meetings or materials used).

Our Plans:

2020
We are planning to have 11 meetups, in six different locations: Medellín, Bogotá, Cali, Barranquilla, Cartagena, Neiva, and Popayán. A 12 week Bootcamp in Medellin and the first community conference: PioConf.

‍♀ How can you get involved?
The women and girls interested in being part of our community can get in touch with our channels:
Article: https://medium.com/@marianvilla/another-community-pionerasdev-a2947f89a592

  • WEB: http://pionerasdev.co/
  • Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/PionerasDevelopers/
  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/pionerasdev
  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pionerasdev/
  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pionerasdev/

Depending on the city, they register for events through the Meetup platform and/or required forms.

What are the requirements that a woman must have to access the offer?
You just have to register on our MeetUp page. Depending on the venue it may be necessary to present your ID to enter.

If you like to know more about our work, we invite you to check this compilation of past events: http://bit.ly/2P6Fsap

We believe in the power of education for changing the world. Support education, support women in tech.

TESTIMONIALS

“I got my first job through pioneras, and everything I learned I owned it to the Community.”
@Mileidy1703

Pioneras has been a community that has brought me so much professionally as personally, where I have was able to develop my soft skills and empower myself of my abilities
@Navas96Sofia

Inspire and invite us to ACT, love the code,
empower us with technology, learn from the experience of
others, generate collective and feminine consciousness, and above all
show us that we can add to multiply!
@ktadelinaco

Being able to be a mentor in Coderise, manage to give talks like
NodeCo, PionerasDev in their different meetups, and be
speaker at a conference Droids 4 Droids
Colombia. Met wonderful people, get
valuable friendships really thank you very much for having
Shocked in my life to change it.
@calypso_bronte

Pioneras changed my life 🙊🤓 Thanks to the community
I met what would be my opportunity to learn development
web and now I’m happy working on it 🍃
@anyruizd

2020 Global Conference

The OpenJS Foundation has rebranded its global conference to OpenJS World! To learn more, visit the event website.

Introducing OpenJS World!

By Announcement, Blog, Event, OpenJS World

The OpenJS Foundation is excited to announce the new name of our global conference: OpenJS World!

While onsite in Montreal at our most recent global conference, the OpenJS Foundation Marketing committee convened to discuss the next chapter of our global event. There was an overwhelming consensus that our global conference brand should be representative of all 32 hosted projects and the feedback to go broader with the name was unanimous. After collecting feedback from the Cross Project Council, project leads, and the Board of Directors, OpenJS World was selected!

As a Foundation that has global participation and reach, we are very excited to adopt this new name and we are looking forward to the wonderful learning and collaboration that will take place at OpenJS World 2020!

We are already planning for the 2020 event and can’t wait to see everyone in Austin, TX on June 23 and 24th! We are also gearing up for the OpenJS Collab Summit. Stay tuned for details. 

The OpenJS World CFP closes Feb 21 and if your company is interested in sponsoring, all information is available in the OpenJS World prospectus. Also, registration opens soon. Sign up for updates here.